estate


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Related to estate: estate tax, Estate planning, Probate estate
References in classic literature ?
D'Artagnan, sick of the closeness of Paris, thought that when a man had three names of his different estates joined one to another, he ought to be very happy in such a paradise; then he shook his head, saying, "If I were Porthos and D'Artagnan came to make me such a proposition as I am going to make to him, I know what I should say to it.
It is true that Marmaduke, by thus purchasing estates that had been wrested by violence from others, rendered himself obnoxious to the censures of that Sect which, at the same time that it discards its children from a full participation in the family union, seems ever unwilling to abandon them entirely to the world.
When the district in which his estates lay had become sufficiently populous to be set off as a county, Mr.
Moreover, I want you to come with me for an early walk, during which we may notice, whilst the matter is fresh in our minds, the peculiar disposition of this place--not merely your grand-uncle's estate, but the lie of the country around it.
I would cut up a big estate like this into small estates for everybody, even for poachers.
The child was now transported to another of Totski's estates in a distant part of the country.
There may have been an error," said His Honour, thoughtfully - "the Court may have underestimated the value of the estate.
Raleigh took a great interest in these estates, so perhaps it was not altogether a hardship to him, finding himself out of favor with his Queen, to go to Ireland for a time.
Mademoiselle Stangerson was, at the time when her father returned from America and bought the Glandier estate, twenty years of age.
The chief source of income on his sister's estate was from the riverside meadows.
Fairlie, the elder) the entailed succession to the Limmeridge estate stood thus--
Besides this, I observed that the men made no scruple to set themselves out, and to go a-fortunehunting, as they call it, when they had really no fortune themselves to demand it, or merit to deserve it; and that they carried it so high, that a woman was scarce allowed to inquire after the character or estate of the person that pretended to her.
This public envy, seemeth to beat chiefly upon principal officers or ministers, rather than upon kings, and estates themselves.
Pierre proposed going to his estates in the south and there attending to the welfare of his serfs.
Sir Wingrave," he said, "I apologize most humbly for what I am about to say, but as the agent of your estates in this county and your--er--legal adviser with regard to them, I am forced to ask you whether you are quite determined upon this--most unexampled piece of generosity.