espouse

(redirected from espouser)
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  • verb

Synonyms for espouse

Synonyms for espouse

to join or be joined in marriage

to take, as another's idea, and make one's own

Synonyms for espouse

take up the cause, ideology, practice, method, of someone and use it as one's own

References in periodicals archive ?
The espousers and advocates would be aghast at being linked to the pre-war racial biology theorists but they--or those who misinterpret or even manipulate their findings--are, in essence, very much in the continuum of that ideology, discourse and politics (Barkan 1992; Hoberman 1992; Kohn 1995; Wiggins 1989, 1997).
This latter group is often blamed for the subsequent loss of ancient knowledge; the espousers of this falsity conveniently ignore that the torches and thugs of the new theocrats did far more damage to the era of reason than any iron Visigothic sword.
Privacy espousers may well find solid public relations value to being good stewards of the most important commodity of the technology age: information.
She doesn't feel spiritually akin to these espousers of libertarianism; their strongly expressed belief in a philosophy she only half-understands but associates with stinginess disturbs her.
The principal figures in Ngarrindjeri Wurruwarrin are legatees of this resistance and subversion, and the assimilated Ngarrindjeri, the whole-hearted espousers of 'Western ideas' are marginal.
An emptyshelled empty-boned humor, Rabelais could have said, and in fact Queneau reproaches these espousers of humorism for excluding Rabelais from their Pantheon.
Indeed, he's become one of the most articulate espousers of its philosophy.
These self-styled champions of human rights and self-professed espousers of human causes were in rage over those Jewish boys' kidnapping and their subsequent killing, which is as it should be.
The Prime Minister underscored the need of high level exchanges between the two countries especially among the youth so that they become the espousers of the excellent diplomatic legacy spreading over more than sixty years.