erudition


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  • noun

Synonyms for erudition

learning

Synonyms for erudition

known facts, ideas, and skill that have been imparted

Synonyms for erudition

References in periodicals archive ?
Here any passage from the classroom to the actual fashioning of art has been much less obvious: the kinds of erudition generated by wide-ranging historical inquiry have been far more resistant to codification in ways that suggested immediate practical applications and rewards.
The broad erudition and diverse methodology acquired during her own intellectual pilgrimage give Duden the tools to integrate Storch's recorded observations into a set of generalizations about the body experiences of suffering women in the 1730's, and about the ways that the doctor attempted to alleviate their miseries.
Still, Backus is to be commended for the care and thoroughness that she brings to the interpretation of the material, and the erudition she brings to the project.
Del Rio emerges as an unlikely raconteur, guiding readers through a maze of theology, law, and magic with wit and erudition.
Aycock's obsessive erudition, her affection for games, and the night sky's weighty presence in her work bring to mind Joseph Cornell's assemblages, which--despite the difference in scale--create a similar feeling of vertigo.
The work that is involved in claiming the right to speak sometimes dominates what is actually being said; there is a Du Boisian ostentation, for example, in West's parading of his dazzling erudition, and some of his occasionally strained attempts to assert the interconnectedness of everything with everything else recall the contorted headmasterly postures of C.
In a long-awaited book written with elegance and erudition, Lester Little undertakes the first full-length study of these maledictions.
His essay on Picasso's Gongora elegantly displays both literary erudition and a firsthand grasp of Spanish.
The fruit of immense erudition, Wind's book is grounded in a deep knowledge of the philosophical and theological literature of the Italian Renaissance.
Although evidence is at best fragmentary, some assessment of Humphrey's personal erudition is needed: did he--or could he--read the hundreds of humanist Latin manuscripts he acquired or commissioned?
I suspect that for all his cosmopolitan erudition, Kitaj (who was born in Chagrin Falls, Ohio) retains a certain Midwestern naivete, and I am convinced that both title and interpretation were arrived at after the fact, which is to say, he created this unsettling image and then decided what it meant.
His erudition was matched only by his terrific gift in finding exactly the passage or image he needed to reveal an entire structure.
The introductory essay identifies humanistic, patristic, but mainly classical sources--not only for direct quotations but also for those indirect allusions through which humanist insiders liked to demonstrate their classical erudition to other insiders.
With his weighty contribution to this discourse, he enriches it at the same time that he presents historians of the Renaissance, in Florence and elsewhere, with a powerful array of erudition and ideas to ponder, to debate, and to place firmly in their stock of indispensable works.