equivocate

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Synonyms for equivocate

Synonyms for equivocate

to use evasive or deliberately vague language

to stray from truthfulness or sincerity

Synonyms for equivocate

be deliberately ambiguous or unclear in order to mislead or withhold information

References in periodicals archive ?
Garnett's status as a treasonous equivocator thereafter called into question the loyalty of any Catholic, for--so the argument went--no one could trust a Catholic who swore an oath of loyalty to the Crown: was the oath in earnest, or was it merely an instance of clever equivocation?
There are consistent attempts to tie them, to mend them and indeed by the end, with the triumphant revenge of Macduff and the successful ascent of Malcolm to the throne of Scotland, aided benevolently by his English allies, it would appear that right wins the day, anarchy is sent packing, and the forces of darkness are exposed as the liars, equivocators, and illusionists they prove themselves to be when they utter their promises to Macbeth about his future.
If you ask the Equivocators their favorite color, they answer, "Red.
The Reformers' fear of both Jesuit equivocators and of James I's equivocal position with regard to Catholics; Protestants' discomfort with how the Reformers' validation of individual spiritual witness emboldened some women to speak in church; even pamphlets which, against the norm, presented "mitigating circumstances" of monstrous births which argued for readers' private interpretations of the events and their "sympathy" (66): these and other early modern cultural trends and phenomena are granted ample and intelligent attention in Marvelous Protestantism.
Subjected as they are to strenuous historicizing, contextualizing, post-structuralist theorizing, ambiguating, and "problematizing," these somewhat slender writings, at once didactic and pleasurable to the common-sense reader, exemplify and embody contradictory "discourses," portray a world suspended uncertainly between fiction and fact or between affirmation and subversion of the established power structures, and reveal their authors as ventriloquists or equivocators, and sometimes as being more of the devil's party than they know or can acknowledge.