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  • noun

Words related to epithalamium

an ode honoring a bride and bridegroom

References in periodicals archive ?
Vendler recognizes address to a reader, ballad, child's poem, dawn poem/aubade, deathbed poem, debate poem, echo-poem, ekphrasis, elegy, emblem poem, epigram, epitaph, epithalamion, hymn, inscription, letter, lover's complaint, lullaby, muse poem, nocturne, pastoral, political poem, praise poem, quest poem, religious poem, romance/fairy-tale poem, seasonal poem, self-reflexive poem, shaped poem, song, twin poems, valediction, variations on a theme--although she concludes by admitting that this list is open/incomplete, adding, as an afterthought, bird poem, eclogue, georgic, testament, and conversation poem.
6) The speaker of the Amoretti and Epithalamion expresses profound anxiety about both his own desires and his beloved's responses, and he is especially uncomfortable with the human vulnerability and corruption that erotic desire uniquely manifests.
Good Friday, 1613," and An Epithalamion, or Marriage Song on the Lady Elizabeth and Count Palatine being Married on St Valentine's Day (1613).
It offers a rhyme index to works of Marlowe (Ovid's Elegies and Hero and Leander), Shakespeare (Venus and Adonis, Rape of Lucrece, Sonnets), Spenser (Amoretti, Colin Clout, Epithalamion, Astrophel, Sidney (Astrophil and Stella, Certain Sonnets, and Lamon), Lodge (Scyla's Metamorphosis), Daniel (Complaint of Rosamond), Drayton (Endymion and Phoebe), Marston (Metamorphosis of Pigmalion's Image), and Petowe (Second Part of Hero and Leander).
This psalm, be it epithalamion, sacred marriage rite or whatever, continues to exercise its fascination on ever new generations of exegetes.
In my second year of graduate study, I listened to him as an auditor read chapters from his forthcoming volume on romantic criticism, and in my final year he directed my dissertation on the epithalamion in the Renaissance.
The woods reiterate each stanza of Spenser's matchless wedding-hymn, Epithalamion.
Strange to say, given its melancholy and stoic resignation, Arnold's masterpiece turns out to be a honeymoon poem, an epithalamion of sorts.
Edmund Spenser in his Epithalamion (1595) celebrates his marriage to Elizabeth Boyle through elaborate number symbolism keyed to months, days, even minutes of the year.
between members of the aristocracy in a preamble to epithalamion.
40)--for in the Epithalamion Spenser celebrates his own bride's eyes as outshining the stars, while the Prothalamion also features a flower catalogue.
The stanza has more in common with the yet more articulated stanzas of the Epithalamion and the Prothalamion, for the motion within each stanza has constraints of repetition that are absent in the epic.
The surprise of the book, however, is Wordsworth, who in Shaw's gutsy reading (which owes much to a fascinating pairing of the 1820 "Thanksgiving Ode" with Spencer's Epithalamion, and then with the Immortality Ode) assesses the war more honestly than his contemporaries, facing "the life that survives and preserves itself through death" only by revealing "the failure of the state to locate a credible symbol of national integrity" (164, 162).
The last long poem in McMorris's book is entitled "The Blaze of the Poui: An Epithalamion.
One is entitled Prothalamion and the other Epithalamion, the Greek for ``before the wedding chamber'' and ``at the wedding chamber''.