episcleritis


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Related to episcleritis: nodular episcleritis
  • noun

Words related to episcleritis

inflammation of the sclera of the eye

References in periodicals archive ?
This can manifest as conjunctivitis, keratitis (either dendritic or neurotrophic), episcleritis, scleritis or uveitis.
Cases of uveitis, scleritis, episcleritis, conjunctivitis, iritis, and orbital inflammation including orbital edema have been reported during postmarketing use.
An ophthalmologist confirmed that the left eye pain resulted from iritis and episcleritis.
Table 1 Pathologies seen by the rapid access clinic at Bradford Royal Infirmary (* % rounded up to the nearest decimal place) Pathology n % * Blepharitis/dry eye/epitheliopathy 15 15% Microbial keratitis 13 13% Conjunctivitis 9 9% Uveitis 9 9% Abrasion/insult/foreign body 9 9% Vitreoretinal 7 7% Post-operative complications 6 6% Posterior vitreous detachment 6 6% Abrasion/trauma/foreign body 5 5% Disc abnormality (non-glaucoma) 4 4% Wet age-related macular degeneration (AMD) 3 3% Lid lesion 3 3% Episcleritis 3 3% Cataract 2 2% Binocular vision 2 2% Other 7 7% Figure 1 The proportion of patients who could have been seen and managed by a primary care PEARS, IP or could only have been managed in secondary care (HES) (n=103) HES 32% IP 36% PEARS 32% Note: Table made from pie chart.
Ocular conditions that occur because of RA are keratoconjunctivitis sicca (KCS), episcleritis, scleritis, corneal pathology and retinal vasculitis (Table I).
Ocular adverse events occurring in < 1% of patients included application site discomfort or irritation, corneal pigmentation and striae, episcleritis, eye pruritis, eyelid irritation and crusting, foreign body sensation, increased lacrimation, macular edema, scleral hyperemia, and uveitis.
Pamidronate, a nitrogen-containing bisphosphonate, has been linked to several types of ocular inflammation, such as anterior uveitis, scleritis, episcleritis, and nonspecific conjunctivitis, and even more rarely, optic neuropathy, peripapillary atrophy, cataracts, and corneal opacities.
Ocular adverse events occurring in less than 1% of patients included application site discomfort or irritation, corneal pigmentation and striae, episcleritis, eye pruritis, eyelid irritation and crusting, foreign body sensation, increased lacrimation, macular edema, scleral hyperemia, and uveitis.
The patient's eye symptoms were thought to be consistent with episcleritis and iritis.
Younger patients may get episodes of inflammation, episcleritis or scleritis and may be treated with topical steroids.
b) The patient is at risk of episcleritis and scleritis
It is important to ascertain the involvement of each of the vascular plexuses, in order to differentiate conjunctivitis from episcleritis and scleritis.
A significant number of inflammatory conditions were treated by the author's practice; iritis, episcleritis, limbitis, pinguecultitis, vernal keratoconjunctivitis (VKC), atopic keratoconjunctivitis (AKC) and seasonal and perennial conjunctivitis.