epigram

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  • noun

Synonyms for epigram

witticism

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Synonyms for epigram

a witty saying

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References in periodicals archive ?
Wright, Thomas, The Anglo-Latin Satirical Poets and Epigrammatists of the Twelfth Century, vol II.
53-4), and the epigrammatist forges a link between the man mythically privileged to view the goddess nude, the artist, and now all of Cnidus.
31) Nisbet & Rudd 2004:141 defines a paraclausithyron as "the lament sung by an excluded lover in front of the woman's closed door" further indicating that this type of lament is "attested as early as Alcaeus 374 L-P"; also that "Hellenistic epigrammatists provide variations on the theme".
Nearly all Renaissance epigrammatists looked back to Martial, the most prominent classical poet in the genre.
Cavafy's poetry echoes no School of Athens, indeed, but recalls instead the glories of the ancient school of Alexandria, reiterating the doctrines and practice of Callimachus and the Neoterics certainly, but even more the exquisite work of the epigrammatists of the city and of its literary satellites--Cos, Samos, Rhodes, Cyrene, Gadara, Berytus, Sicily, and Magna Graecia--throughout the eastern Mediterranean.
Professor Harold Bloom will not rank among the great epigrammatists of history.
A good many translations and imitations of minor poets and epigrammatists (often by contemporary American writers relishing a chance to be smutty and cultured at the same time) hardly earn their place on their quality as English poetry, though they usefully remind us of the range of the classical heritage.
There are fifteen definite occurrences of the sea of love then,(19) almost all in the epigrammatists, amongst whom Meleager was particularly fond of it.
AD 40-103) in some 1,500 pungent and often indecent verses that served as models for French and English epigrammatists of the 17th and 18th centuries.
Unlike his forebears, he is unable to make a living or to fulfill his deepest ambition, the study of the Greek and Latin epigrammatists, but his stoic philosophy, culled from his reading, stands him in good stead.
In the long history and among scores of exponents of the epigram, there are surprisingly few epigrammatists who used the form for aggressive and personal blame, censure or invective (yogo~), the essential mode and matter of iambic verse.