epigram

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  • noun

Synonyms for epigram

witticism

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Synonyms for epigram

a witty saying

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References in periodicals archive ?
Unlike Pliny or the epigrammatists, the Erotes presents specific viewing epiphanies that are constrained or limited by the access the temple setting allows.
It just adds one more intermediary, the epigrammatist, who created the fiction of a speaking urn and puts the speaker into the role of a reader.
But a religious epigrammatist was ridiculing another from a committed position of loyalty to his own church, beliefs or customs.
To the passionate epigrammatist, the tribulations of romantic relationships are fertile territory:
Martial, the Roman epigrammatist (first century ad) uses it metaphorically for someone who has stolen his lines, and the use of the word for 'plagiarism, plagiarist' becomes common from the Renaissance.
He's known as an epigrammatist," adds Northam, "but he also has great emotional truth.
The Greek epigrammatist, Antipater of Thessalonica echoes (or is echoed by) Ovid at A.
Where Catullus's verse thinks of the kiss as an erotic gesture, Martial's epigrams construct it as a social one; the passionate basia bestowed by the republican poet upon his faithless lover are replaced in the Flavian epigrammatist by kisses of greeting that function as the semiotic equivalent of a handshake.
7) Simonides of Ceos was a lyric poet and epigrammatist renowned for his opportunism and cupidity.
physician, teacher, scientist, poet, essayist, novelist, biographer, critic, lecturer, epigrammatist.
In "Incisivita sublime: l'arte epigrammatica di Aurelio Orsi nel giudizio di Giambattista Marino," Tobias Leuker used Marino's La galeria (1619) to draw attention to a little-known Neo-Latin epigrammatist, Aurelio Orsi.
Instead, Fitz-Geffry had exercised his power as epigrammatist to depict him with a fictionalized name in a satiric epigram.
In chapter four,"King James, Andrew Melville and the Neo-Latin Religious Epigram," Doelman gives an interesting account of the career of Melville as an epigrammatist, using it to exemplify how the religious epigram worked.
This apparent merging of poet and persona leads Gutzwiller to assert that in this group of epigrams Anyte offers a "feminine perspective on death expressed through a chorus of female voices--grieving mothers, dying daughters, and the epigrammatist herself .
Puttenham notes that it is particularly the comical poet and the epigrammatist who engage in this kind of wordplay.