epigram

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  • noun

Synonyms for epigram

witticism

Synonyms

Synonyms for epigram

a witty saying

Synonyms

References in periodicals archive ?
It just adds one more intermediary, the epigrammatist, who created the fiction of a speaking urn and puts the speaker into the role of a reader.
It was one of the oldest devices of the Greek epigrammatist to make the statue, the urn, the column, or the monument speak to the beholder or passer-by .
But a religious epigrammatist was ridiculing another from a committed position of loyalty to his own church, beliefs or customs.
To the passionate epigrammatist, the tribulations of romantic relationships are fertile territory:
CENTURIES from now, should our ancestors sort through the ephemeral artworks that rubbished the last century and, moreover, should they observe how even the truly lasting works seemed disproportionately obsessed by the ephemera and detritus of our culture (The Waste Land syndrome), they may wonder: Was there any poet who examined our world--regarding its weaknesses, imperfections, and evils--and fashioned the kind of permanent statements that the lyricists of the English sixteenth and seventeenth centuries, of the Italian thirteenth century, or the epigrammatists of Classical Rome, crafted out of and for their own?
A brief examination of his fellow epigrammatists in the Anthology provides a part of the literary context and a body of similar poetry against which to gauge Palladas's work.
31) Nisbet & Rudd 2004:141 defines a paraclausithyron as "the lament sung by an excluded lover in front of the woman's closed door" further indicating that this type of lament is "attested as early as Alcaeus 374 L-P"; also that "Hellenistic epigrammatists provide variations on the theme".
Cavafy's poetry echoes no School of Athens, indeed, but recalls instead the glories of the ancient school of Alexandria, reiterating the doctrines and practice of Callimachus and the Neoterics certainly, but even more the exquisite work of the epigrammatists of the city and of its literary satellites--Cos, Samos, Rhodes, Cyrene, Gadara, Berytus, Sicily, and Magna Graecia--throughout the eastern Mediterranean.
Professor Harold Bloom will not rank among the great epigrammatists of history.
In the long history and among scores of exponents of the epigram, there are surprisingly few epigrammatists who used the form for aggressive and personal blame, censure or invective (yogo~), the essential mode and matter of iambic verse.