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  • adj

Synonyms for epigrammatic

precisely meaningful and tersely cogent

Synonyms for epigrammatic

terse and witty and like a maxim

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References in periodicals archive ?
As tautly and epigrammatically scripted by Ken Nolan ("Black Hawk Down") and crisply directed by Mikael Salomon (TNT's "The Grid"), "The Company" treks urgently through history -- Berlin before the wall was built, Hungary during the '50s uprising, the Bay of Pigs and the collapse of the Soviet Union.
The news about the astounding accuracy of felony convictions in the United States, delivered by Justice Scalia and Joshua Marquis in the passage set out epigrammatically above, would be cause for rejoicing if it were true.
Technically, as well as epigrammatically, against the putatively freely flowing scriptura continua or ephemera (transcribble outpouring of bagatelle impressions, sensations, sallies, and ruminations)--"the people that ma[k]e the books knows what's the correct thing to do" (11).
William Buchan, the author of the vastly popular Domestic Medicine (1769)--a text which was still being reprinted in the nineteenth century--summed up what he saw as the enlightenment project of medical manuals when he epigrammatically declared patients "may be their own physicians" if they take the advice of such works.
4) rather than be so epigrammatically immortalized.
Helfert also commented epigrammatically on Fibich's stylistic backwardness, his failure to exploit the chance of learning from the huge wave of stylistic advance brought by world music in the 1890s, and so organically to shift his form of musical expression onwards: "In terms of stylistic progression, his place is before Smetana or at least with Smetana.
Cornis-Pope's first writer chosen for individual attention is Pynchon whose explanations he defines epigrammatically as 'post-modern Gothic paradox' (p.
It reflects not just the notes (corrected where necessary and even "improved"), but also the rehearsal indications by City Ballet personnel--Balanchine, for example, and former Music Director Gordon Boelzner--that evoke, epigrammatically, key moments and characters: "head swings" (Apollo) or "aspirin" (refers to the "headache" step in Serenade, where five girls bring the back of the hand to the forehead) or "Diana foot forward" (from a later score of Concerto Barocco used by Jillana; this entry identifies a step by Diana Adams in the third movement).
The writings of Baltasar Gracian, the Spanish Jesuit scholar who often expressed himself satirically and epigrammatically, eventually would serve as a model for some of Monterroso's own work.
The published text of Method confirms the possibility of religious experience but does so almost epigrammatically.