encomiastic

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  • adj

Synonyms for encomiastic

formally expressing praise

References in periodicals archive ?
Cnut's sometime Scandinavian eulogist, Sigvat the Scald, says merely that Cnut's ship was called `the Dragon' (`dreka') and makes no mention of bulls' horns (although dreka was a common name for Viking warships, based on the dragon figurehead); the Norman Encomiast may be seeking to make into a compliment a pre-established and unstated pun on Cnut's name from Norman courtly circles, when he elaborates his rhetoric about the horns on the king's ships: `who could look upon .
Philip was as pitiless as the age demanded: he condemned hundreds of refugees to death by starvation and exposure at the siege of Chateau Gaillard during the winter of 1203-4; even Guillaume le Breton, Philip's sycophantic encomiast and official royal biographer, praises Philip for matching Richard's cruelty like-for-like in the vain hope that "no one would believe him less than Richard in strength and courage.
Would that I were a first-class encomiast living off the gratuities of someone rich and powerful, traveling by his side, chronicling his every word and deed, scattering flowers at the feet of his entourage, laughing heroically at his witty cultural faux pas, wiping spittle from his chin.
As a dedicated feminist encomiast, she, too, relies on a resounding memorial art for "telling" the "memory of her" and "what she has done.
A former member of the Books Abroad editorial board, he was the encomiast for the 1994 laureate of the Neustadt International Prize for Literature, Kamau Brathwaite, and, as a member of the 1998 Neustadt jury, successfully championed the candidacy of that year's laureate, Somalian writer Nuruddin Farah.
It is mingled with the smell of defeat, the adjournment of the troop of encomiasts, the absence of the flashes of photographers, and the attempts of advisors to wash their hands.
Annette Tomarken remarks on the self-conscious literariness of the flea's encomiasts as follows: "The contributors all wished to transform a mundane, even embarrassing incident into complimentary literary creations that would demonstrate both poetic skill and a desire to please a learned society lady.