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Betterton had been fully involved in the production of Henry Purcell's dramatic operas in the early 1690s and was about to mount three major operatic productions at the Queen's Theatre in the course of six weeks, The British Enchanters (21 February 1706), The Temple of Love (7 March) and The Wonders in the Sun (5 April).
The debut novel of film designer David Bryan Russell, and the first book of a series, Enchanters is a fantastic story about a nineteen-year-old young woman, Glys Erlendson, who discovers a beautiful, magical, and at times terrifying world in coexistence with our own.
And only dullards will object to his desire to re-enchant the world--so long as the enchanters work from below rather than through the Church, the State, and the School.
The War of the Roses is not just a fact in a history book; it is the centuries-old feud between the houses of Weirland, an underground community of wizards, enchanters, and warriors who are born to carry out their destiny as part of a magical society.
In his splendid interpretation of the novel, Para leer a Cervantes (El Acantilado, 2003), Martin de Riquer insists that throughout his long adventure Don Quixote does not change, that he never loses his certainty that it is the enchanters who distort reality so that he appears mistaken when he attacks windmills, wineskins, sheep, or pilgrims, believing them to be giants or enemies.
Inspired by European fairy tales and South Asian folklore, it deals with the challenges of growing up in multi- cultural Britain where spells are cast not only by witches and wizards but also by modern enchanters of television, games consoles and mobile phones.
Before we ever met, my wife loved Fairies and Enchanters, a collection of Cornish folk-tales adapted by Amabel Williams-Ellis.
This may or may not have been true, but their reputation as enchanters has been passed down to us through different translations and has arrived in English as the words magic, magician etc.
The terrified king seeks astrologers and enchanters to translate.
Those who cultivate and manipulate language, the story implies, are truly enchanters.
There are no mythological beasts keen on finding out if people taste better with or without their arms ripped off and no wizened enchanters demanding the answer to rhyming conundrums, although there are computer viruses and a multitude of pop-up windows to contend with.
Lang had many enchanters (or magicians, or sorcerers, or wizards) in his collections, especially in the French fairy tales, although there were a good many in tales from other lands, as well (such as the Estonian tale, "The Dragon of the North," already described).
The situation was further complicated when Don Quixote imagined that the frailes with the carriage were enchanters holding captive princesses, and then demanded the immediate release of the "prisoners"; he addressed the supposed enchanters as "bedeviled people" (gente endiablada).
Developed by Byte Enchanters, Legal Crime invites players to compete as ruthless crime family bosses, gaining power through extortion, bootlegging, entertainment, gambling and troubleshooting.