emit

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Synonyms for emit

Synonyms for emit

to discharge material, as vapor or fumes, usually suddenly and violently

to send out heat, light, or energy

Synonyms for emit

References in periodicals archive ?
Typically, lasers emit light of one pure color, or wavelength.
The new quantum cascade laser emits up to 15 milliWatts of peak power at a wavelength of nearly 20 microns at temperatures up to -191 degrees Fahrenheit or -124 degrees Celsius.
Materials engineering allowed the Bell Labs researchers to achieve a high-powered laser that can emit light over a broad range of the electromagnetic spectrum.
Over the last 8 years, Vriesendorp has been using this isotope, which emits solely betas, to treat some 130 Hodgkin's patients who have failed to benefit from all previous therapies.
Our new OLED compound emits a very bright, beautiful green color that is 50% more efficient than previously published results for OLED's.
Black holes that emit their highest-intensity radiation at an X-ray energy of 1,000 electronvolts; were found to spin rapidly but in a direction opposite to the disk.
A group led by Jean Frechet of the University of California, Berkeley has also made significant progress in developing dendrimer LEDs that emit white light.
As it forms, a neutron star emits a brief, but intense, burst of neutrinos.
When struck by light of an appropriate wavelength, a light spot emits a photon, while a dark spot does nothing.
It pulses, it flickers, and some 20 times a day it emits a torrent of X rays more intense than the combined radiation of a million suns.
The large ephemeral field should energize electrons in the mesosphere, causing them to crash into nitrogen, which then emits red light, he says.
An atom caught between the laser beams moves around in a random fashion as it emits photons until by chance it stops for an instant.
The dye in turn emits orange light with a wavelength of 617 nanometers.
The "semiconducting conjugated polymer" emits light when positive and negative charges, supplied by electrodes on opposite sides of he thin plastic film, meet on the same bit of polymer chain.
When electrons drop into those middle levels, they emit photons with less energy, and therefore longer wavelengths, than usual.