elegiac


Also found in: Dictionary, Encyclopedia, Wikipedia.
Related to elegiac: elegiac couplet
  • adj

Synonyms for elegiac

Words related to elegiac

expressing sorrow often for something past

Related Words

References in periodicals archive ?
1) With her first small volume of poetry titled Elegiac Sonnets, and Other Essays, Charlotte Smith of Bignor Park entered the English literary marketplace in 1784 as a Petrarch for her era, aspiring to both the lifetime recognition and lasting fame achieved by her laureled fourteenth-century Italian predecessor.
Dancing At Dutchtreat is a prime example of a near jubilant side to the album, while Mary Jane Doesn't Live Here Anymore has a elegiac quality coupled with a gorgeous melody that means one cannot help but think of Svensson.
MacDonald (English, film studies, Wilfrid Laurier University) considers the female elegiac mode as it appears in 20th-century Canadian poetry written by women.
Rudiments of Flight is elegiac and celebratory, dauntless in its exploration of both the "soul's geometry" and the metaphysics of everyday minutiae.
THE THINGS WE DID FOR LOVE, BY NATASHA FARRANT THE third book by writer and literary scout Natasha Farrant is an elegiac love story set during the month of February 1944, also acting as homage to the French village of Oradoursur-Glane whose inhabitants were inexplicably murdered by a German military division in June 1944.
Texas poet Joe Brundidge, who also performs as Element615, has an amazing tender streak running through his poetry, whether it's on the elegiac "Raffiki" or the fatherly "Applesauce.
The Ars Amatoria was composed in two stages between 1 BC and AD 2 and has been variously described as an elegy on seduction (it is written in elegiac couplets, a Greek format) and sexual attraction or as a parody on didactic verse.
I was phoning my report when a microphone poked into the phone box, recording my admittedly elegiac words.
In the most typically elegiac 'Mahlerian' Andante movement, the gracefully sweeping strings were allowed to flow at a speed that avoided sentimentality.
His deep regard for heroic, historic structures and the people and processes that transform them gives his work a beautifully tender, elegiac quality.
The elegiac prism I offer, however, exposes Addie Bundren's grotesque funeral procession in this novel as the slow and painful process of the survivors to establish a new relationship to the world following a loss.
In detailed discussions, Schneider shows how Colonna rewrites Petrarchan affetti dogliosi as "self-therapeutical" (174) elegiac mourning for her deceased husband ("scrivo sol per sfogar I'interna doglia").
The ties that bind women elegists to one another differ radically from what we consider normative elegiac bonds.
The elegiac energy these poems celebrate is visceral, but it is held within a delicate, contemplative embrace that the second of the concluding "Deux meditations" renders more explicit.
There is, therefore, something of an elegiac tone to the collection, as seen in stories such as 'Fiftieth' and 'The Full Glass'.