electrocute

(redirected from electrocutions)
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  • verb

Synonyms for electrocute

kill by electric shock

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kill by electrocution, as in the electric chair

Synonyms

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References in periodicals archive ?
Lethal injection is the primary execution method in all states that have capital punishment, but some states allow inmates the option of electrocution, hanging, firing squad or the gas chamber.
Electrocutions, hangings and the like have been abandoned by the majority of US states ages ago in a bid to make death sentences more palatable to the public and judges who were afraid to pass cruel or unusual punishments that violate the constitution.
Whitham's death is among 18 electrocutions under review by the Pentagon's inspector general.
In certain cases in-theater, improperly wired CONEX, CHU, and AB units--combined with equipment failures--resulted in electrocutions.
Other products reportedly involved in electrocutions include pipes, poles, fences, wires, chains, pliers, hunters' tree stands, flying toys, vending machines and amusement rides.
At the end of 2001, new agents were hired with specialized training in bird electrocutions.
Decreases in job-related deaths from homicides and electrocutions in 1999 were offset by increases from workers struck by falling objects or caught in machinery.
Decreases in job-related deaths from homicides and electrocutions in 1999 were offset by increases in deaths from workers struck by falling objects or caught in running machinery.
Florida allegedly "botched" three electrocutions, two of which occurred in the past two years.
According to a National Institute for Occupational Safety and Health (NIOSH) Occupational Injury Deaths 1980-89 report, electrocutions are the fifth leading cause of occupational injury deaths, accounting for 7% of all occupational injury deaths between 1980 and 1989.
This, combined with bird-safe new construction, will minimize electrocutions, equipment damage and associated outages.
In Cuba, officials reported two dead from the hurricane, both electrocutions because of downed power lines.
Cars and trucks were involved in more than one-fourth of the work-related deaths; heart attacks caused about one-eighth; and industrial vehicles or equipment, falls, and electrocutions each contributed roughly one-tenth.
Yet they are stooges up against Alex's feats of spit-and-baling-wire engineering, enduring electrocutions, barbell beanings and plunges into a nearly frozen swimming pool.