egoistical


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  • adj

Synonyms for egoistical

Synonyms for egoistical

limited to or caring only about yourself and your own needs

References in periodicals archive ?
The incarcerated bird becomes the predatory hawk which, in a bravura statement, dares to cross barriers not so much for the challenge to society, but for an egoistical pleasure in the everlasting search of her own self.
Even our language is instructive--we learn the texts of our discipline, we do disciplined enquiry, we must be rigorous, and we offer our work as submissions--these discursive terms offer insight into the deeply ascetic, self-denying (yet) egoistical paths we follow as participants in what I take as a very peculiar practice.
It has drowned the most heavenly ecstasies of religious fervour, of chivalrous enthusiasm, in the icy water of egoistical calculation" (Greene 1982: 122).
Realistically, corruption is a suicide strategy--whether pursued through obedience to traditional norms or from egoistical moral disorientation.
No one can deny that positions of leadership can be abused for egoistical purposes; the extent of corruption in business and politics (especially in some parts of the world) make it seem strange that Price has little to say on the phenomenon.
The successful husband-lover will, during every act of the love drama, seek to redirect all egoistical impulses, and, like a skillful driver, at every moment hold himself under intelligent control (pp.
Yvette decided to become very egoistical, over the top and bigheaded and our friendship and everything soured," he said.
Combined with a market-oriented economy and the enormous influence of the entertainment industry, it has often become the basis for egoistical self-enrichment at the cost of others, irresponsibility with respect to the community at large and extreme selfishness or even coldness.
This passage dialogizes at once Wordsworthian imagination through the assertion that although the speaker's imagination was active, it "still enjoyed the present hour," thus creating an oblique opposition to the egoistical sublime, which compulsively strives for transcendence and immortality as is the case in "Tintern Abbey.