egalitarian

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Synonyms for egalitarian

Synonyms for egalitarian

a person who believes in the equality of all people

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Antonyms

favoring social equality

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References in periodicals archive ?
For instance, some egalitarians hold the view that the net effects of what Ronald Dworkin calls brute luck--luck that one is subject to independent of one's choices--should be shared equally.
See Anderson, "How Should Egalitarians Cope with Market Risk?
Brain surgeons are a rather and here comes that really dirty word in the egalitarian lexicon, elite group.
Philosophers within this tradition disagree deeply about what equalisandum should count in a fundamental way for egalitarians.
23) In spite of their differences concerning the choice of equalisandum, these egalitarians (and others as well (24)) converge on the responsibility-tracking view of how much redistribution there should be.
based on the experience of European socialist parties, Michels inferred that even in the most ostensibly egalitarian organizations, structural and psychological imperatives lead inevitably to division of labor, hierarchy, and a set of leadership interests distinct from the interests of the organization's nominal constituents.
Ellis seems open-minded enough, yet he poses the question of how democratic and egalitarian premises lead to authoritarian conclusions without even a soupcon of familiarity with Hayek, Ludwig von Mises, or Ronald Coase.
Galbraith has sketched out the political economy of an egalitarian America.
Despite this belief in equal opportunity, high medical costs have placed egalitarians in a weak position.
The Rawlsian approach offers a possible resolution to the difficult to defend philosophical position of a "decent minimum" of health care advocated by egalitarians.
In particular, I show that disadvantages that result from perfectly free choice can constitute egalitarian injustice.
I hold that disadvantages that you freely choose to risk incurring can remain unjust in egalitarian terms.
Of these, the Clinton-Gore welfare destruction was such an affront to egalitarians that many could simply not stomach voting for Gore on that issue alone.
A better approach, for social egalitarians, would combine universal service with conscription.
Rauch concedes much of what the egalitarians and humanitarians have to say.