ectotherm


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  • noun

Synonyms for ectotherm

an animal whose body temperature varies with the temperature of its surroundings

References in periodicals archive ?
Temperature is a major abiotic factor influencing biological functions of ectotherms (Angilletta 2009).
Energetic demands are roughly an order of magnitude greater in endotherms relative to ectotherms of the same size (e.
Key words: behavioral thermoregulation; body temperature, preferred; ectotherms at northern latitudes; gestation; Nerodia sipedon; postprandial thermophily; radiotelemetry; reproductive vs.
Temperature is one of the most important environmental factors controlling development in ectotherms including echinoderms, which progress faster through their developmental stages as temperature increases (Hoegh-Guldberg & Pearse 1995).
Ectotherm life-history responses to developmental temperature.
The environment can affect the size or number of offspring either directly or indirectly (Kingsolver and Huey, 2008), and recent work has indicated that environmental temperature has a profound direct effect on ectotherm offspring and complex relationships with adult body size and fitness (Angilletta et al.
Sprint speed, in particular, can be critical for an ectotherm attempting escape from a potential predator (van Berkum et al.
Other arboviruses infect a variety of ectotherms, including species of lizards (2-4), snakes (5-11), and turtles (12,13), but the knowledge of ectotherm involvement in the ecology of WNV is limited.
Our finding that similar agents occur in various other terrestrial habitats in central North America suggests that such nuclei may pose a formidable challenge to the overwintering survival of ectotherm ic animals that rely on supercooling to withstand frost exposure.
Modeling global macroclimatic constraints on ectotherm energy budgets.
In this paper, we examine the past impacts of climate modes on a terrestrial ectotherm in the Pacific Northwest of North America in an attempt to understand the effects of future environmental variation.
Hot rocks and much-too-hot rocks: seasonal patterns of retreat-site selection by a nocturnal ectotherm.