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  • noun

Words related to dug

an udder or breast or teat

References in classic literature ?
While grandmother took the pitchfork we found standing in one of the rows and dug potatoes, while I picked them up out of the soft brown earth and put them into the bag, I kept looking up at the hawks that were doing what I might so easily do.
I fed upon roots, and in my bitterness I dug for the bitterest, loathing the sweeter kind.
Then I jumped in the canoe and dug out for our place, a mile and a half below, as hard as I could go.
They went about poking sticks into the sand, and when they found a soft place they went down on their knees and dug with their hands.
When the dog had dug down only a few inches he grabbed something and pulled it up, and it was an arm and a sleeve.
She went into the house; I stayed behind a few minutes to plant in my garden a handful of roots I had dug up in the forest, and which I feared would wither if I left them till the morning.
It was dug on a green slope in a corner of the kirk-yard, where the wall is so low that heath and bilberry-plants have climbed over it from the moor; and peat-mould almost buries it.
He locked th' door an' dug a hole and buried th' key.
Ben, in his long, lonely wanderings about the island, had found the skeleton--it was he that had rifled it; he had found the treasure; he had dug it up (it was the haft of his pick-axe that lay broken in the excavation); he had carried it on his back, in many weary journeys, from the foot of the tall pine to a cave he had on the two-pointed hill at the north-east angle of the island, and there it had lain stored in safety since two months before the arrival of the HISPANIOLA.
There he had dug quite a deep hole for dog darnel; and had set a mole trap.
The grave was being dug slowly; the fish fled on all sides while their retreat was being thus disturbed; I heard the strokes of the pickaxe, which sparkled when it hit upon some flint lost at the bottom of the waters.
Dantes dug away the earth carefully, and detected, or fancied he detected, the ingenious artifice.
They dug a grave for her in the new soil, where the roots of the pine-trees impeded their spades; and when her bones had rested there nearly two hundred years, and a city had sprung up around them, a church of stone was built upon the spot.
The last attempt had been made by Cobus Quackenbos, who dug for a whole night, and met with incredible difficulty, for as fast as he threw one shovelful of earth out of the hole, two were thrown in by invisible hands.
The poor man thought he would try to better himself; so, pulling off his red coat, he became a gardener, and dug his ground well, and sowed turnips.