drunkard

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References in periodicals archive ?
Chaudhary said the 10-member team will keep a close watch on all entry routes along the state border and present the drunkards before the village council once caught.
When they wanted to transport those drunkards, or any other suspect, the process of dragging the horse over from the barn to hook it up to the patrol wagon certainly didn't result in the prompt response city dwellers came to expect in the 20th century.
We've got the place all to ourselves, No drunkards running amok.
Which means a large number of people waiting in extreme discomfort, especially when these revolting cabins are constantly used by drunkards and drug addicts.
REGARDING Stephen Siddoway's email stating that nightclubs are to blame for the drunkards on our streets and not supermarkets.
My dear brother, come to Umm Al Hassam and see restaurants full of drunkards very near to residential buildings.
00pm) A former military policeman takes a tough stance against drunkards in Cumbria.
00pm) A former military policeman gets tough with drunkards in Cumbria.
Manhood lost; fallen drunkards and redeeming women in the nineteenth-century United States.
Awake, ye drunkards, and weep" (Joel 1:5) for the hour of the Lord is at hand
In these "dark temperance" tales, "individual drunkards [are] often portrayed as morally reprehensible and personally disgusting," and the end result is almost always a gruesome death for the drunkard.
Plaid Cymru are dangerous, psychotic drunkards under whose rule Wales would quickly descend into chaos and Warlordism,' says the site, a little unfairly.
Ray Porter and Bo Foxworth are delightful as the drunkards who ply Caliban (the excellent Stephen Weingartner) with liquor.
Doytown is inhabited by "respectable" society's castaways, including freed or runaway slaves, prostitutes, drunkards, suspected witches, abused children, and simply those who prefer precarious freedom to restrained conventionality.
IS it not bad enough that the world image of Scots is that of a kilted drunkards without one of our own airports, Prestwick, having it painted across one of its bars?