(redirected from down-at-the-heel)
Also found in: Dictionary, Idioms.
  • adj

Synonyms for down-at-heel



Synonyms for down-at-heel

References in periodicals archive ?
I like a genuinely depraved, down-at-the-heels town, wait staff with vacant eyes, the whole suffused by a pervasive sense of despair.
Rated R": (5 episodes, Spring 2009) -- The creators of the hit Web series "Horrible People" and "Wainy Days" return with a nighttime soap opera parody about the new girl in town trying to make her way at a seedy, down-at-the-heels club.
Astaire's appeal to the down-at-the-heels audience of the 1930s was his effortless elegance.
On 26th Street West in Bradenton, a short block north of Cortez Road, look for a down-at-the-heels strip center anchored at its south end by a diamond in the rough.
At first Elena startles the valet service by greeting Francois there, but when she starts living with him in his down-at-the-heels apartment, she begins to realize he's a decent guy who is really in love with Emilie.
Kratchman reworked the overall character of the existing, down-at-the-heels building, giving his client-family a "new," elegant, upper Madison Avenue-style, single-family townhouse mansion, now consisting of six floors plus a usable, excavated cellar, stretching the building from three to six floors and increasing the usable living space from 4,400 to 6,670 s/f.
TWO MEN share a drink in a well-appointed study; one is clearly prosperous, the other down-at-the-heels.
The down-at-the-heels salesman is not conspicuous, even among the passing suits and fashionable women, for there are other vendors under the elevated railway, a nether region of greasy spoons and the hard-up, a penumbra fringing the great white way of Ginza.
At various spots around town, down-at-the-heels commercial buildings are being given new life.
The overall feeling is not exactly one of film-noir dissolution, but one that definitely does invoke the sort of down-at-the-heels waterfront ambience that is commonly associated with Glasgow, where the film takes place.
The Robesons are old settlers in this once down-at-the-heels urban neighborhood very recently gone trendy and upscale.
1 percent, scarcely distinguishable from the national average and well below the figures for such down-at-the-heels states as Alabama (2.
Well into the novel, Astley reveals that the narrator is a woman named Janet, a newcomer to the bush town and the operator of a down-at-the-heels news agency where no one buys reading matter, for they are all television addicts.
Of course, it is impossible to tell just how many gays and lesbians have bought homes in such down-at-the-heels towns: There has been no study assessing how a city's prosperity has resulted from gays' investments.
Although the world's big brewers may not be interested in down-at-the-heels countries like Mozambique, many have sniffed around South Africa.