injustice

(redirected from doing an injustice)
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Synonyms for injustice

Synonyms for injustice

an act that is not just

Synonyms for injustice

the practice of being unjust or unfair

References in periodicals archive ?
I had to decide as quickly as possible the needs of the club (if any) before it could be classed as a promotion probability, and at the same time, I had to try individuals and groups of individuals in permutations of positions in order to be certain I had not overlooked anything and was not doing an injustice to anybody.
I had to decide as quickly as possible the needs of the club (if any) before it could be classed as a promotion probability, and at the same time I had to try individuals and groups of individuals in permutations of positions in order to be certain I had not overlooked anything and was not doing an injustice to anybody.
And the thing is with me, with my injury, if I'm not 100 percent or close to it, I feel I'm doing an injustice to the team by putting myself out there.
To name just a few would be doing an injustice to the 25 or more others I could choose.
Aiding this characterization is the fact that he routinely overlooks how the book anticipates and addresses reservations that he raises (he stresses the influence of The Shipping News on the popularity of Newfoundland fiction as if I hadn't broached that point myself, for instance, and accuses me of doing an injustice to these writers, whereas I acknowledge that I am emphasizing certain aspects of what is multifaceted writing).
I think we would be doing an injustice to the people who live along that road.
With two games to go, we're within three points and fifth place could get it, although that might be doing an injustice to Ross County, who have beaten Hibs and Celtic to reach the Cup Final.
However, no matter how Barthelemy reached his conclusions, it is difficult not to agree that a reductionist view that neatly ties up answers about questions in medieval society is doing an injustice to the period.