dogmatize

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  • verb

Synonyms for dogmatize

state as a dogma

speak dogmatically

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30) Legal theorizing, both as a historical and a philosophical exercise, moves inexorably toward legal dogmatizing.
The problem with these nuclei of myth was that in their survival in the new code, that is, through their co-optation by the Qur an (and the subsequent dogmatizing tradition), they were put to the service of a rhetoric that was almost inimical to 'narrative' itself - this despite the qur anic claim that there they are being told in the best of narrative ways" (p.
As Lacugna and McDonnell suggest in their article, "Returning from 'The Far Country': Theses for a Contemporary Trinitarian Theology," should we not refrain from dogmatizing any one trinitarian model (East or West) and be less speculative and aggressively theoretical in our theology of the triune God, especially whenever this divorces our thinking from the divine economy?
The key points at issue here are (1) the succession of Peter, (2) Rome as centre and guarantor of unity, and (3) the dogmatizing of the claim of papal primacy by the First Vatican Council.
It is precisely this lack of literary planning -- and of the intellectual dogmatizing so prevalent among Latin American revolutionary groups born in the 1960s and 1970s -- that makes these guerrilla letters unique and fascinating.
Arnold and Clough were familiar with the source of the scholar-gypsy legend, Joseph Glanvill's seventeenth-century book The Vanity of Dogmatizing, and the two young poets had walked together in the Cumnor countryside near Oxford where the poem is set.
Nevertheless, the poem had a special significance for him, because it was associated with Clough and their Oxford years; both Arnold and Clough were familiar with the source of the scholar-gypsy legend, Joseph Glanvill's seventeenth-century book The Vanity of Dogmatizing, and the two young poets had walked together in the Cumner countryside near Oxford where the story is set.
Although the particular book, Glanvill's Vanity of Dogmatizing, falls out of view almost immediately, the poem itself goes on to echo one text after another in a Bakhtinian corridor of voices.