divergency

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  • noun

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Synonyms for divergency

an infinite series that has no limit

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the act of moving away in different direction from a common point

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References in periodicals archive ?
There are divergencies in European and American theology, and it is only natural [that], when the Younger Churches of Asia and Africa come of age, they will also in time develop a theology perhaps quite different from Euro-American theology.
Indeed, one of the reasons that German companies rely on visual divergencies from the libretto and heavy-handed production "concepts" foreign to any idea in the composer's head is simply to take the audience's mind off the caterwauling onstage, which is often even more of a travesty than the settings and direction.
Writing specifically about the local churches, Tillard applies his final remarks to the diversity of cultures: "Uniformity suffocates communion, while certain divergencies on fundamental points render it non-viable.
The position of South American Baptists has been similar in general terms to that held by the missionaries, but, as we shall see, there have been variations, ruptures, and divergencies.
These values change an the stock markets rise and fall, but the basic divergencies remain.
Where older studies often depicted the relationship in terms of conflict and warfare, more recently scholars have recast their accounts in terms of diverse interactions, specific divergencies, and numerous instances of mutual support.
The first topic addressed in the present issue deals with the divergencies in English and American trust law.
There is evidence of a kind of strategic anticipation of certain aspects of it in 1934, and scholars such as Charles Post and Robin Kelley have shown that stages might exist in its 1935-1939 applications, as well as divergencies in implementation on the local level.
These divergencies exemplify the different paradigms of early literacy education (Crawford, 1995), raising questions about the universal developmental stages in literacy learning and stimulating debate about the direct teaching of skills like phonics and the roles families can play in early literacy.
The combination of the structural divergencies in the two economies with the human capital divergence (Pakistan's education system is, for example, in near collapse) suggests a fairly clear prognosis for the medium term, Within fifteen years, arid barring a relapse by India, its economy will begin to acquire the same features as the economies of Southeast and Northeast Asia, supported by a technical workforce of international standard, although constrained by a large poorer class within the population.
The countries for which there are substantial divergencies between the two measures are Greece, Portugal and to a lesser extent Spain, which may indicate the relatively high degree of protection still enjoyed by manufacturing in these countries.
Financial statements can only lose credibility over time if divergencies of that kind are allowed to continue.
There are a number of obvious divergencies between my studies of the developed North and underdeveloped South but, considering health policies and politics in all the countries examined, one finding repeatedly emerged: no matter what the organizational arrangements or modes of financing or economic background, professionals dominate decision making in the health sector.