divan

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Related to divans: divan bed
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Synonyms for divan

bed

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Synonyms for divan

a long backless sofa (usually with pillows against a wall)

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a Muslim council of state

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a collection of Persian or Arabic poems (usually by one author)

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a Muslim council chamber or law court

References in classic literature ?
Captain Nemo," said I to my host, who had just thrown himself on one of the divans, "this is a library which would do honour to more than one of the continental palaces, and I am absolutely astounded when I consider that it can follow you to the bottom of the seas.
He goes to the divan, stumbling into the fender and over the fire-irons on his way; extricating himself with muttered imprecations; and finishing his disastrous journey by throwing himself so impatiently on the divan that he almost breaks it.
HIGGINS [coming grimly at her from the divan, and accompanying her to the door] Good-bye.
Brusquely I dropped the hand before it reached my lips; and it was so lifeless that it fell heavily on to the divan.
On entering the long room I perceive Mills established in an armchair which he had dragged in front of the divan.
No doubt he ran off because he did not know what to say to you," said the youth on the divan.
My wife, Helena, died-- at her birth; and this is my big daughter Vera, in mourning, as you see; and this, this, oh, this pointing to the young man on the divan .
It was round, and a large divan completely encircled it.
From the corner of the divan of Persian saddle-bags on which he was lying, smoking, as was his custom, innumerable cigarettes, Lord Henry Wotton could just catch the gleam of the honey-sweet and honey-coloured blossoms of a laburnum, whose tremulous branches seemed hardly able to bear the burden of a beauty so flamelike as theirs; and now and then the fantastic shadows of birds in flight flitted across the long tussore-silk curtains that were stretched in front of the huge window, producing a kind of momentary Japanese effect, and making him think of those pallid, jade-faced painters of Tokyo who, through the medium of an art that is necessarily immobile, seek to convey the sense of swiftness and motion.
Lord Henry stretched himself out on the divan and laughed.
On a brilliant day in May, in the year 1868, a gentleman was reclining at his ease on the great circular divan which at that period occupied the centre of the Salon Carre, in the Museum of the Louvre.
The gentleman on the divan was a powerful specimen of an American.
They had this melancholy retreat to themselves, and seated on the divan enclosing the central steam-radiator, they were staring silently at the glass cabinets mounted in ebonised wood which contained the recovered fragments of Ilium.
She looked at him thoughtfully, and turned back to the divan.
It was Hasrat Mohani who first mentioned in his Sharh-i-divan-i-Ghalib the fact that Gul-i-r'ana included many verses that the latter-day divans of Ghalib did not have.