distract

(redirected from distractibility)
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  • verb

Synonyms for distract

Synonyms for distract

Synonyms for distract

draw someone's attention away from something

disturb in mind or make uneasy or cause to be worried or alarmed

References in periodicals archive ?
In older children, distractibility suggests problems sustaining attention due to the draw of extraneous stimuli.
Testing included the revised Weschler Adult Intelligence Scale (WAIS-R) digit span, mental arithmetic, digit symbol substitution, freedom from distractibility, and controlled oral word association as measures of frontally mediated cognition.
In addition, her teachers reported a history of somatic complaints, poor self-concept, impulsivity, depressed mood, distractibility, oversensitivity, anxiety, and irritability.
In 1956, Thomas and Chess began a longitudinal study of 136, mostly white, middle- or upper-middle-class Jewish families from New York City The research team collected data on the children's activity levels, biological rhythms, responses to new objects, adaptability, reaction intensity, distractibility, attention span, and mood.
This causes distractibility in the classroom and startling/crying at loud noises like thunderstorms, blenders, hair dryers, and vacuums.
He noted that other data presented to the panel suggested that infants exposed to multiple courses of prenatal steroids were almost seven times more likely to show distractibility than infants who had received a single dose.
The Jacobsons concluded, "The most highly exposed children were more than three times as likely to perform poorly in terms of the scores for full-scale IQ, verbal comprehension, and freedom from distractibility and more than twice as likely to be at least two years behind in comprehension in reading.
We believe the larger municipalities will soon embrace some of these new lighting and signage technologies, as they lessen driver distractibility, and may offer enhanced lighting with less energy consumption.
Preterm infants-generally those born 23 to 36 weeks after conception, as opposed to the normal 37- to 42-week gestation-face an increased risk of behavioral problems, ranging from impulsiveness and distractibility to more serious conditions like autism and attention deficit hyperactivity disorder (ADHD).
These transitional sleepers also tended to score higher on an assessment of difficult temperament which identified traits such as irritability and distractibility.
Ninety-one percent of this group had at least four symptoms of the disorder; the most common were impulsivity with money (93%), general impulsivity (91%), distractibility (90%), and being "in a fog" (90%).
Additionally, disorientation and distractibility might be mistaken for symptoms of dementia instead of mania.
It has many effects similar to stimulants in that it can improve attention, impulsivity, and distractibility.
Daytime symptoms of chronic sleep loss include: irritability, difficulty concentrating, distractibility, fatigue, lack of coordination, loss of appetite, gastrointestinal disturbances, and muscle pains.
ADHD affects 3-7 percent of school-age children(2) and manifests itself in levels of attention, concentration, activity, distractibility, and impulsivity that are inappropriate to the child's age.