dissimulate

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  • verb

Synonyms for dissimulate

to change or modify so as to prevent recognition of the true identity or character of

Words related to dissimulate

hide (feelings) from other people

Related Words

References in periodicals archive ?
The embryo or the insect in its first phase of development does not yet have a form; the mask dissimulates it.
Pato explicitly articulates her concerns as an artist, which include (but, again, are not limited to) a mistrust of metaphor, of language as an emancipatory power, of the poet's "duty of Representation (the method by / which the subject/poet relates to the poem's / subject, identifies with it or dissimulates behind it: / lexis)," of poetry as "an experience of self or discovery / of nature or sensibility," and of the supposed autonomy of the canon.
1) Sterilization kills all forms of microbial life inclusive of those that are highly resistant and dissimulates to kill bacterial spores.
Yet for the play of photograph and painting to have its effect it may be all the same whether van Zyl or another artist in fact worked with a mechanical aid, or whether the painter dissimulates that fact by making it appear to the viewer that he or she did so.
Does the document that admits its bias have greater value than that which dissimulates its bias?
Te rhetorical possibility of such a thing exists only through recourse to an unmarked norm that dissimulates its status as a fashion.
The so-called desire for immortality, he concludes, dissimulates a desire for survival that precedes it and contradicts it from within.
The dilemma this raises--and it is a fundamental problem in thinking about China today--is whether it is better to deal with an autocratic political system that clearly represents itself as autocratic, or with an autocratic political system that partially dissimulates itself with gestures toward openness.
any space implies, contains and dissimulates social relationships--and this despite the fact that a space is not a thing but rather a set of relationships between things (objects and products).
To the extent that language itself transforms the specular I of the mirror stage into full subjectivity, inserted within the network of social meanings and frames of intelligibility; to the extent that language has an imaginary dimension that dissimulates its rupture with the real and promises to re-present the world, including the subject's "inner reality"--to this extent, language itself can become an objet petit a.
he who dissimulates "suffers in the estimation of other persons .