dissent

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Synonyms for dissent

disagree

Synonyms

dissent from something

Synonyms

Synonyms for dissent

Synonyms for dissent

(law) the difference of one judge's opinion from that of the majority

a difference of opinion

Related Words

withhold assent

be of different opinions

References in periodicals archive ?
Much of the most interesting reading to come out of the 20th-century Court is Brandeis dissents.
All-time favorite Supreme Court justice: I don't think I could pick a particular justice, but there are opinions and dissents I like a great deal.
would want to know whether dissents are more moderate when written for a
The Role of Dissent in Improving Democratic Decisionmaking.
So, in a nutshell, this majority/minority divide is about judicial approaches, which Lord Atkin explained in his dissent when he held that 'I view with apprehension the attitude of judges who .
Equally significant in Obergefell is the fact that the conservative wing of the Court authored four separate dissents rather than one unified dissent.
I then discuss why nonbinding opinions such as concurrences or dissents are constructive.
56) Essentially, dissents are "important to the extent they influence the actions of judicial majorities twenty years from now or broaden the jurisprudential range .
It includes the number of votes for and against each policy directive, the names of any dissenters, and a classification of all dissents as favoring tighter or easier policy or reasons for dissenting other than the stance of policy.
Second, assessing the value of published dissents in a specific court necessitates a consideration of the unique context within which that court operates.
65) A characteristic of this, Fried explains, is when a Justice relies on and refers to his own prior dissents as authority.
In Furman he wrote a separate dissent to offer a set of "somewhat personal comments":
Court, Professors David Oppenheimer and Allan Brotsky, editors, and their scholarly chapter authors, have made a valuable contribution to legal history as well as to judges, scholars, lawyers, and others interested in the dynamics of judicial decision-making, the relevance to modern law and life of a justice's dissents from over fifty years ago, and, in particular, the life and views of Justice Carter.
Justice Ginsburg, in reflecting on dissents, observed that "with difficult cases on which reasonable minds may divide, sometimes intensely, one's sense of [j]ustice may demand a departure from the majority's view, expressed in a dissenting opinion.
Hughes's statement captures the modern romantic ideology of judicial dissents in the United States: the lone dissenter, whose wisdom will one day be received as our nation continues along its progressivist course.