disputative


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  • adj

Synonyms for disputative

inclined or showing an inclination to dispute or disagree, even to engage in law suits

References in periodicals archive ?
This is not quite identical with the text of Aristotle: the numerous occasions on which Thomas criticizes the arguments of Aristotle, the large sections which he considers to be disputative and not strictly scientific, do not belong to this basic and underlying philosophy.
Just as Burton describes the way the higher born students have infiltrated the university, wearing away at its very humanistic and philosophical fiber, this subsuming invective--called "Digression of the Miseries of Schollers" in the synopsis, and marked by its bitter, disputative tone, encroaches on the more philosophical, objective tone of the "Overmuch Study" section, as though illustrating the petty conflicts and concerns on which the scholar has been reduced to spending his time.
Matters of faith, justification, and sanctification--stages of the ordo salutis beyond the range of the soul's preparatory fitting--are summoned in book 1 for disputative service.
Informatively engaging readers from first page to last, In State Of Becoming deftly covers commonly controversial issues affecting the church and effective, practical, and tactics with which to avoid, ameliorate, or positively assist in resolving disputative issues for the betterment of the churches larger interests.
spends little time examining the traditional attributes and, as with efficient causality, he is more dismissive than disputative.
Consequently, both plaintiff and defendant can offer evidence, none of which is disputative, and about which reasonable people might disagree.
41) In this ethos, a more sophisticated rationale might be admitted for the conspirators' interest in Shakespeare's play, especially its disputative stance toward treason as a category relative to authority.