disport

(redirected from disports)
Also found in: Dictionary.
Graphic Thesaurus  🔍
Display ON
Animation ON
Legend
Synonym
Antonym
Related
  • all
  • verb
  • noun

Synonyms for disport

to occupy oneself with amusement or diversion

to make a public and usually ostentatious show of

activity engaged in for relaxation and amusement

Synonyms for disport

occupy in an agreeable, entertaining or pleasant fashion

Synonyms

Related Words

References in classic literature ?
Built by a retired admiral in the early years of the nineteenth century, the curving bow windows of the front, now filled with reddish-yellow light, suggested a portly three-decker, sailing seas where those dolphins and narwhals who disport themselves upon the edges of old maps were scattered with an impartial hand.
A low ridge intervenes between the Phutra plain where the city lies, and the inland sea where the Ma-hars were wont to disport themselves in the cool waters.
But I fancy there were times when she thought it rather hard that the daughter of a roving adventurer--as she considered him--like Blair Stanley should disport herself in silk dresses, while her own daughters must go clad in gingham and muslin--for those were the days when a feminine creature got one silk dress in her lifetime, and seldom more than one.
At a very early hour in the morning, twice or thrice a week, Miss Briggs used to betake herself to a bathing-machine, and disport in the water in a flannel gown and an oilskin cap.
Having made this grand point, he wandered into a denser haze and maze of nonsense than even a mayor might have been expected to disport himself in, and came out of it with the brilliant discovery that to take the life of a fellow-creature was to take something that didn't belong to you.
Up a wide and ancient staircase the smart girl preceded Tom, shading the chamber candle with her hand, to protect it from the currents of air which in such a rambling old place might have found plenty of room to disport themselves in, without blowing the candle out, but which did blow it out nevertheless--thus affording Tom's enemies an opportunity of asserting that it was he, and not the wind, who extinguished the candle, and that while he pretended to be blowing it alight again, he was in fact kissing the girl.
They can only destroy his surviving appeal (while he now disports himself with his heavenly virgins) to adherents within the Mohammedan diaspora if they accurately understand the man and his message.
They act as, to rephrase Winnicott's term, a good enough poem-mother, making the world safe, negotiable, and comforting while its jouissance, which disports ego-boundaries, exceeds permissible 'meanings' and undermines the 'canons of culture'.
It is in this gap that the criminaloid disports himself.
21) </pre> <p>In Richard Ellmann's translation:</p> <pre> Today as in the time of Pliny and Columella the hyacinth disports in Wales, the periwinkle in Illyria, the daisy on the ruins in Numantia and while around them the cities have changed masters and names, while some have ceased to exist, while the civilizations have collided with each other and smashed, their peaceful generations have passed through the ages and have come up to us, fresh and laughing as on the days of battles.
It might be in the same city as some of Spain's finest sights, the Prado with its interminable queues, the Casa de Correos (post office) with its elegant architecture, the Bernabeu, where Beckham displays and disports himself, but given the gulf between them, it might as well be in another country.
And Robert East as John Middleton disports himself in a manner of baffled bemusement, so fitting for a consultant surgeon chap caught on the hook.
Mercator is either behind the scenes or, more interestingly, over at another station from which he is shouting over his shoulder as he disports with his wife.
In this case, the spectators in the engravings, as well as the ILN's readers, are treated to a celebration of London, Britain's principal metropolis, as it decks itself with all the trappings of public mourning and disports in the pomp of a state occasion.