disjuncture


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  • noun

Synonyms for disjuncture

Synonyms for disjuncture

References in periodicals archive ?
Disjuncture with personal frameworks persisted of course, precisely because of the rebalancing of work and domestic roles--and men were now involved as fully as women.
We were either unable to see the image (if we walked too close to the screen), or unable to hear the dialogue (if we moved too far away from it), a disjuncture that served to emphasize our dependence on the intersection of sound and vision.
Macun in his chapter draws out and explains the disjuncture between union strength on the shopfloor and union weakness at the industry and national levels.
Along the way, Cooper posits a radical disjuncture in colonial labor policy.
Coverage includes discriminatory forms and their manifestations within particular sectors of the economy; the disjuncture between racial discriminatory treatment and employer justifications; sexual harassment at work; variations in the discriminatory experience across public and private sector workers, and in workplaces of varying gender and racial composition; the possibility that gender, race, and social class intersect in ways that make experiences and processes of discrimination unique; forms of housing discrimination, their prevalence, and how racial/ethnic minorities are impacted, and how these relations vary by residential setting; and how housing discrimination is often rooted in sex and familial status.
At the start of his catalogue essay for the 2006 Biennale of Sydney, director Charles Merewether states that his exhibition "aspires to be about the 'now' of the contemporary, bearing the disjuncture and discontinuities as much as correspondences and transversal movements of encounter and exchange.
A more glaring weakness of the book can perhaps-be found in the disjuncture between title and subject-matter.
In those instances when an organization was involved from outside of the network of mothers and housewives, there appears to have been an important disjuncture between the rhetoric and the goals of the mothers in the streets and the organizers.
She finds that predominant definitions and explanations of occupational sex segregation do not match contemporary empirical evidence, and that this disjuncture means that the understandings of sex inequality that underpin legal and policy approaches are out of date and often even counterproductive.
And yet the disjuncture fortuitously reminded us that mass culture vividly shaped the imaginative possibilities of Rainer's practice.
There was a strange disjuncture in South Africa between the world of struggle politics and the hard bargaining behind closed doors that eventually brought about the creation of a new political order and it is difficult to evaluate the actions of the men and women who were engaged in both at once or in succession.
The author refrains from speculation, suggesting a major disjuncture between the era of warring states and the wars of unification that would benefit from scholarly investigation.
The deliberately awkward inclusion of women muddying themselves up in incongruous environments functions as a wry comment on the medium's formal principle of disjuncture, while the figures' ironic return to nature becomes a prelude to the dislocation and conceptual layering evident in the paintings.
Sellers' book calls attention to a disjuncture between popular feeling and the inability of politics to translate it into action, and so leaves us with more of a puzzle.
A work made in Germany, Eternal Wanderers, 1919 (later confiscated by the Nazis for the "Degenerate Art" exhibition), for example, shows Segall melding Cubist faceting and disjuncture with Expressionist emotional values to capture the suffering and dislocation caused by World War I.