disgrace


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Synonyms for disgrace

Synonyms for disgrace

Synonyms for disgrace

bring shame or dishonor upon

reduce in worth or character, usually verbally

damage the reputation of

References in classic literature ?
The old gentleman had long regarded his son as one dead; John's place had been taken, the memory of his faults had already fallen to be one of those old aches, which awaken again indeed upon occasion, but which we can always vanquish by an effort of the will; and to have the long lost resuscitated in a fresh disgrace was doubly bitter.
Ulysses was glad when he saw her, and said to his son Telemachus, "Telemachus, now that you are about to fight in an engagement, which will show every man's mettle, be sure not to disgrace your ancestors, who were eminent for their strength and courage all the world over.
I've always been proud above my station in life, and disgrace would kill me.
But she was brought up in the country because her mother had to leave New York after the disgrace, whatever it was: they lived up the Hudson alone, winter and summer, till Mamma was sixteen.
Methinks it is more disgrace for one of our garb to wring hard-earned farthings out of the gripe of poor lean peasants.
And now within all the automatic succession of theoretic phrases-- distinct and inmost as the shiver and the ache of oncoming fever when we are discussing abstract pain, was the forecast of disgrace in the presence of his neighbors and of his own wife.
My public servants have been fools and rogues from the date of your accession to power," replied the State; "my legislative bodies, both State and municipal, are bands of thieves; my taxes are insupportable; my courts are corrupt; my cities are a disgrace to civilisation; my corporations have their hands at the throats of every private interest - all my affairs are in disorder and criminal confusion.
That is not any disgrace either, for of course no one can know everything, not even father or mother.
It is His will that we should not injure others by the gratification of our own earthly passions; and you have a mother, and sisters, and friends who would be seriously injured by your disgrace; and I, too, have friends, whose peace of mind shall never be sacrificed to my enjoyment, or yours either, with my consent; and if I were alone in the world, I have still my God and my religion, and I would sooner die than disgrace my calling and break my faith with heaven to obtain a few brief years of false and fleeting happiness - happiness sure to end in misery even here - for myself or any other
Schemes have indeed been laid in the vestry which would hardly disgrace the conclave.
Now In cannot let you disgrace my name,--'" "and my son," she had meant to say, but about her son she could not jest,--"'disgrace my name, and'--and more in the same style," she added.
He was described as a bully, a hoodlum, a rough-neck, a professional slugger whose presence in the ranks was a disgrace to organized labor.
But Catherick had too much pride and spirit, as some people said--too much feeling, as I think, sir--to face his neighbours again, and try to live down the memory of his disgrace.
In the majority of the shameful cases of disease and death from destitution, that shock the Public and disgrace the country, the illegality is quite equal to the inhumanity--and known language could say no more of their lawlessness.
To "have the bailiff in the house," and "to be sold up," were phrases which he had been used to, even as a little boy; they were part of the disgrace and misery of "failing," of losing all one's money, and being ruined,--sinking into the condition of poor working people.