disesteem


Also found in: Dictionary, Legal.
Graphic Thesaurus  🔍
Display ON
Animation ON
Legend
Synonym
Antonym
Related
  • all
  • verb
  • noun

Synonyms for disesteem

to have or express an unfavorable opinion of

unfavorable opinion or judgment

Synonyms for disesteem

the state in which esteem has been lost

have little or no respect for

References in periodicals archive ?
But it is a familiar fact that most people enjoy gossip, are rewarded by the esteem of others for conveying socially useful gossip, and fear the disesteem that follows from being the subject of negative gossip, or from spreading false rumors.
Butman countered that the teachings of Jesus were timeless; that "his stress on the worth of the single soul, and his disesteem of the organized group," were as relevant to an industrial age as to an earlier agricultural society.
In some quarters, that disesteem took form in sustained efforts to make observing into something done not by a human, but by something nonliving--an instrument or some other kind of machine, or even merely photographic film.
269) This has a clear effect on the allocation of esteem, but a much less clear effect on the allocation of disesteem.
However, the evolutionary dynamics of religion and ethics are crucial to the integrative system and influence what brings esteem and disesteem in a given society.
In fact I have held him in high disesteem for some considerable time now.
accepting that moral rules are followed, not because they are moral, but because not following them brings disesteem.
If any person thinks the examination of the rest of the animal kingdom an unworthy task," Aristotle wrote, "he must hold in disesteem the study of man.
It is used to describe a member of a group who treats the group with disesteem and seeks acceptance into some other group of higher standing.
One is the opprobrium for violating the norms of fair argumentation; the other--the stronger--the disesteem and reduced status that accompanies any violation of the socially sanctioned values of acceptable patient care (see La Valle 1994).
The irrumator incurred no serious disesteem, while to fellate was to act out an accepted inferior role, passive concentration on another's pleasure, servicing another - all postures appropriate to women, slaves, and prostitutes of both sexes, but never to free men.