discover

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  • verb

Synonyms for discover

Synonyms for discover

to obtain knowledge or awareness of something not known before, as through observation or study

to disclose in a breach of confidence

Synonyms for discover

References in classic literature ?
His extraordinary absences became notorious, and, when he used to reappear again in society, men would whisper to each other in corners, or pass him with a sneer, or look at him with cold searching eyes, as though they were determined to discover his secret.
There are no "Christ's Churches" in Rome, and no "Churches of the Holy Ghost," that I can discover.
He had come upon Germans and had not killed them; but it was because the killing of Germans at large was not yet the prime motive of his existence--now it was to discover the individual who slew his mate.
You said to yourself, First of all, I will discover the motive; then, perhaps, a clue which seems to belong to the one will lead me to the other, or both?
When Shylock discovers his loss he is mad with grief and rage.
How it will end, if she discovers the truth--and what new complications she may not introduce into a matter which, Heaven knows, is complicated enough already--I leave you to imagine.
Criticism, no doubt, easily discovers in 'Pilgrim's Progress' technical faults.
He very soon sees that no change has been wrought in him, that there is nothing new and nothing greater in the exercise of his physical faculties, and discovers his own real nothingness.
The traveller who stops at the best houses, so called, soon discovers this, for the publicans presume him to be a Sardanapalus, and if he resigned himself to their tender mercies he would soon be completely emasculated.
Guess at her relief when strychnine is mentioned, and she discovers that after all the tragedy is not her doing.
Norah's next employers may discover you; and Norah may throw up a situation next time which we may never be able to find for her again.
There are some of us now reaching middle age who discover themselves to be lamenting the past in one respect if in none other, that there are no books written now for children comparable with those of thirty years ago.
I could plainly discover whence one family derives a long chin; why a second has abounded with knaves for two generations, and fools for two more; why a third happened to be crack-brained, and a fourth to be sharpers; whence it came, what Polydore Virgil says of a certain great house, NEC VIR FORTIS, NEC FOEMINA CASTA; how cruelty, falsehood, and cowardice, grew to be characteristics by which certain families are distinguished as much as by their coats of arms; who first brought the pox into a noble house, which has lineally descended scrofulous tumours to their posterity.
Our chief desire was to discover some new road by which we might avoid having anything to do with the Turks.
This has been sufficient to make me alter my purpose of publishing them; for although the reasons by which I had been induced to take this resolution were very strong, yet my inclination, which has always been hostile to writing books, enabled me immediately to discover other considerations sufficient to excuse me for not undertaking the task.