diffract

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undergo diffraction

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With devices consisting of gratings with spatial period under 450nm, colour does not diffract to non-zero orders at normal incidence.
Van Veen said, showing a visitor a selection of the components, of different sizes, each grooved imperceptibly with precise lines that diffract light.
The array spacing is -250 run, designed such that the array diffracts visible light.
His lab has developed a chip device that diffracts light in the presence of certain antibodies.
The only case in which a processor repeatedly accesses memory is (1) when no other processor diffracts it and (2) it constantly reaches for the lock on the toggle bit.
2~ Rather, the signal propagates down the corridor and out a window, where it diffracts and propagates along the building face to a different floor.
The method includes providing an ordered array of particles received within a curable matrix composition; curing a first portion of the matrix composition, wherein the first cured portion diffracts radiation at a first wavelength, curing another portion of the matrix composition, wherein the other cured portion diffracts radiation at another wavelength; and exposing the array to radiation to exhibit an image.
The microstructure of the insect's wings not only shuns water but also scatters and diffracts light to create an iridescent color.
Physically, a quasiperiodic object diffracts to give a pattern with sharp Bragg spots.
When used as a spatial light modulator in computer-to-plate (CTP) products, the device diffracts high power laser beams to provide a high-speed, ultra-precise method of transferring digital images directly onto a printing plate.
On the other side of the coin, the 'hologram' industry has also arguably misused the word and confused the public and the media by either calling anything that diffracts light from an interference pattern or micro-structured surface, whether created though optical interference or not, a hologram, or conversely by calling holograms DOVIDs, OVDs, and all manner of other things.
As radiation passes through a specimen, the phase of the wave can shift at the boundary between materials of two different densities, just as light diffracts when passing through a glass of water.