diary


Also found in: Dictionary, Medical, Legal, Financial, Acronyms, Encyclopedia, Wikipedia.
  • noun

Synonyms for diary

journal

Synonyms

Synonyms for diary

a daily written record of (usually personal) experiences and observations

a personal journal (as a physical object)

Related Words

References in classic literature ?
It is with the very stir and throb of that romantic nocturnal march that the diary suddenly ends.
Not the writer of the diary, anyhow; the general sheathed it in time.
On the next page of the Diary, another entry appears.
Today The Diary Corporation announced the launch of a new personal health management application, The Diary(TM), as a solution for patients and caregivers.
The Web Diary service has been created to enable independents to offer their patients and prospective patients the ability to book appointments, 24 hours a day, seven days a week, from home or on the move with a mobile device.
The purpose of a pain diary is to capture important, often overlooked details a doctor might find helpful.
Yoko's Diary is somewhat in the tradition of Anne Frank's Diary but with lots of background material before the diary, some interspersed with the diary and then at the end.
The partnership with KS Styling Team will set the tone for the type of submissions that Model Diary will look for.
The Wimpy Kid series by Jeff Kinney has remained consistently at the top of the New York Times lists since the first book, Diary of a Wimpy Kid, was published in 2007.
A survey carried out by broadcaster E4 found 83 percent of today's teenage girls keep a diary compared with 69 percent in the 1990s when the internet was not very popular.
So, how did the diary end up in a US court at the centre of a legal fight between an American businessman and a group of African expatriates?
The diary includes features from your favourite Mirror Racing writers, plus all the essential information to keep one step ahead.
The basic daily headache diary was well accepted by patients and was well accepted by physicians," Dr.
An earlier, pilot study with 76 patients demonstrated the paper-based diary improved diagnostic sensitivity from 75% to 92% and specificity from 58% to 87% when combined with a clinical interview and examination (Cephalalgia 2008;28:1023-30).
The practice of writing a diary for intensive care patients was first noted in Denmark in the 1980s and was soon followed up in Sweden and Norway (Bergbom et al.