diapir

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Related to diapiric: piercement
  • noun

Words related to diapir

a domed rock formation where a core of rock has moved upward and pierced through the more brittle overlying strata

References in periodicals archive ?
The diapiric process and glaciotectonic disturbances may have been favoured by altitude differences in the Viru plateau and at the bottom of the Gulf of Finland, which generated the change of load and increase in the pressure on the edge of the ice cover.
However, research indicates that magmatic modal layers may originate through many other processes (Naslund and McBirney 1996), including, for example, diapiric ascent and synmagmatic deformation (e.
Most Maykopian outcrops are tied with phenomena of diapirism, which have caused the deposits to be in the surface or down along the kernels of numerous diapiric folds.
Most Maykopian out-crops are tied with phenomena of diapirism, which have caused the deposits to be in the surface or down along the kernels of numerous diapiric folds.
Many scientists think that hotspots mark locations where diapiric convection cells, called mantle "plumes", rise beneath lithospheric plates (Morgan, 1971; Wilson, 1973).
In addition, the shales associated with the rollover faults are commonly over-pressured and diapiric, adding to structural development in the overburden and increasing the seal on faults.
Medium to low-grade, bulk mineable disseminated deposit-type, Greisen stockworks or disseminations associated with granite emplacement at depth or laterally, controlled by reactivated thrusts by the "pushing aside" effect observed in diapiric intrusions.
The Ma'reb/Jawf area was mostly covered in sand but included a diapiric salt anticline with some associated bituminous shales.
Compare, for example, thermal modelling studies indicating that diapiric ascent of magma in the crust is impossible (Weinberg 1996; Petford 1996) with structural studies of felsic plutons indicating diapir-like emplacement (Sylvester 1964; Paterson and Vernon 1995).