diamond


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  • noun

Synonyms for diamond

a transparent piece of diamond that has been cut and polished and is valued as a precious gem

very hard native crystalline carbon valued as a gem

a parallelogram with four equal sides

Synonyms

Related Words

a playing card in the minor suit that has one or more red rhombuses on it

References in classic literature ?
His feathers were sky-blue and gold, his feet and his beak of such glittering rubies that no one could bear to look at them, his eyes made the brightest diamonds look dull, and on his head he wore a crown.
O'Reilly," said the duke, leading him into the chapel, "look at these diamond studs, and tell me what they are worth apiece.
To one in Edmond's position the diamond certainly was of great value.
I remember well that diamond, which belonged to the queen.
Cropole looked at the diamond so long, that the unknown said, hastily:
Ah, well,' he said, 'that is where Solomon really had his mines, his diamond mines, I mean.
In consequence of this battle Kutuzov received a diamond decoration, and Bennigsen some diamonds and a hundred thousand rubles, others also received pleasant recognitions corresponding to their various grades, and following the battle fresh changes were made in the staff.
And even then there will be no diamond sunbursts and marble halls.
When I saw a real diamond in a lady's ring one day I was so disappointed I cried.
That Socialist would no more steal a diamond than a Pyramid.
The fact is, he had given her a very small portion of the brilliants; a pretty diamond clasp, which confined a pearl necklace which she wore--and the Baronet had omitted to mention the circumstance to his lady.
Reuben Rosenthall had made his millions on the diamond fields of South Africa, and had come home to enjoy them according to his lights; how he went to work will scarcely be forgotten by any reader of the halfpenny evening papers, which revelled in endless anecdotes of his original indigence and present prodigality, varied with interesting particulars of the extraordinary establishment which the millionaire set up in St.
A similar superstition was once prevalent, as I have heard, in ancient Greece and Rome; not applying, however (as in India), to a diamond devoted to the service of a god, but to a semi-transparent stone of the inferior order of gems, supposed to be affected by the lunar influences--the moon, in this latter case also, giving the name by which the stone is still known to collectors in our own time.
As I wandered about, seeking anxiously for some means of escaping from this trap, I observed that the ground was strewed with diamonds, some of them of an astonishing size.
He examined the side on which the monogram appeared, inlaid with diamonds.