dialectology


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  • noun

Words related to dialectology

the branch of philology that is devoted to the study of dialects

References in periodicals archive ?
Fisiak (1982) provides further support for the use of such records in historical dialectology, stating that
Still, for the practice of dialectology, the emergence of classic patterns of linguistic differentiation, clustering and patterned geolinguistic gradation are firm signs of accurate retrieval of data even from such scattered "mohican" informants.
Indeed, the variety labeled as Central in Catalan dialectology corresponds to Barcelona, historically the most prestigious modality and the one taken as the baseline by the Institut d'Estudis Catalans for purposes of normalization.
Part II begins with a chapter on Pastoral Quechua linguistics, and Durston confronts the complexities of dialectology and orthography in the formation of Pastoral Quechua.
His research interests are in African languages and literature, particularly African literature, Shona lexicography, sociolinguistics, dialectology and orthography.
This book bundles a selection of thirteen papers presented at the 11th International Conference on Methods in Dialectology (Methods XI), held from 5-9 August 2002 at the University of Joensuu in Finland.
It contains, for example, a review of standard opinions on Homer's date, family and place of origin, dialectology and the linguistic peculiarities of Homer's poetry, figures and tropes.
Alonso Zamora Vicente's classic dialectology presents the following details:
Literature was even described as a "dialect" and held to be an object of study to which the methods of general dialectology should be applied (see Jakobson's work on Khlebnikov).
PROFESSOR T ARWYN WATKINS, who died at his home in Swansea this month, was a pioneer in the modern study of linguistics and a leading figure in Welsh dialectology.
Samuels, 'The Dialect of the Scribe of the Harley Lyrics', in Middle English Dialectology, ed.
For the Speculum vite, see Richard Beadle, `Middle English texts and their transmission, 1350-1500: some geographical considerations', in Speaking in our Tongues: Proceedings of a Colloquium on Medieval Dialectology and Related Disciplines, ed.
The French tradition simply needs more discussion than I can give it here, beyond observing that at least some French authors were quite close to Dutch ones, and that in this respect, as in the treatment of cessio bonorum, see infra note 136, the Dutch belonged in some important ways to the French cultural circle; legal dialectology, as it were, links Dutch-Roman law and French-Roman law together.
Its geography, dialectology, and commerce are far more important to the Palestinian Jew than Islamic art and archeology.
It will also be of interest for specialists in linguistics and dialectology, since Berber and local terms are employed throughout the text, all the more accessible at http://vecmas-tombouctou.