dialect


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Synonyms for dialect

Synonyms for dialect

a variety of a language that differs from the standard form

a system of terms used by a people sharing a history and culture

specialized expressions indigenous to a particular field, subject, trade, or subculture

Synonyms for dialect

the usage or vocabulary that is characteristic of a specific group of people

References in classic literature ?
Make no sound," he cautioned in the man's own tribal dialect as he released his hold upon the other's throat.
She appealed to the sleeping Lumai, who awoke heavily and fatly, who muttered and mumbled easy terms of Somo dialect to the effect that it was a most decent world, that all puppy dogs and eldest-born sons were right delightful things to possess, that he had never yet starved to death, and that peace and sleep were the finest things that ever befell the lot of mortal man- -and, in token thereof, back into the peace of sleep, he snuggled his nose into the biceps of his arm for a pillow and proceeded to snore.
The inhabitants of Shetland know him far and wide, under a name in their dialect which means, being interpreted, "The Master of Books.
Behind them a group of swaggering, half-drunken Yorkshire dalesmen, speaking a dialect which their own southland countrymen could scarce comprehend, their jerkins marked with the pelican, which showed that they had come over in the train of the north-country Stapletons.
1) In diction, dialect and style it is obviously dependent upon Homer, and is therefore considerably later than the "Iliad" and "Odyssey": moreover, as we have seen, it is in revolt against the romantic school, already grown decadent, and while the digamma is still living, it is obviously growing weak, and is by no means uniformly effective.
French, that dialect of it which was spoken by the Normans--Anglo-French (English-French) it has naturally come to be called--was of course introduced by the Conquest as the language of the governing and upper social class, and in it also during the next three or four centuries a considerable body of literature was produced.
The one is commonly transitory, a sound, a tongue, a dialect merely, almost brutish, and we learn it unconsciously, like the brutes, of our mothers.
They ascribe the known difficulty one people have to understand another to corruptions and dialects.
They were often very turbulent meetings, with half a dozen men declaiming at once, in as many dialects of English; but the speakers were all desperately in earnest, and Jurgis was in earnest too, for he understood that a fight was on, and that it was his fight.
In India the natives spoke different dialects which only a few people understood, so she was not surprised when Martha used words she did not know.
These appellations signify simply 'the River,' according to the dialects of the countries through which it passes.
Again, if I had given way to my own impulses, I should have wished to go into the differences, some of which are to my mind very suggestive, between the Zulu and Kukuana dialects.
DURING the long years after the Norman Conquest when English was a despised language, it became broken up into many dialects.
Yet it might be that some very ancient language had altered little, and had given rise to few new languages, whilst others(owing to the spreading and subsequent isolation and states of civilisation of the several races, descended from a common race) had altered much, and had given rise to many new languages and dialects.
I did not, like him, attempt a critical knowledge of their dialects, for I did not contemplate making any other use of them than temporary amusement.