diabolism


Also found in: Dictionary, Encyclopedia, Wikipedia.
Graphic Thesaurus  🔍
Display ON
Animation ON
Legend
Synonym
Antonym
Related
  • noun

Synonyms for diabolism

a belief in and reverence for devils (especially Satan)

References in periodicals archive ?
Treatises like the Malleus Maleficarum (1486) composed in Germany by an inquisitor of the Catholic Church, Heinrich Kramer, manifest a total conflation of magical practice with diabolism.
Even the coat-trailing atheism and toy town diabolism of Dublin's ephemeral (the author, David Ryan's, word) Hell Fire Club are cast as early stirrings of a (somewhat dimly) enlightened and 'modernizing' secularism.
Redden, Andrew, Diabolism in Colonial Peru, 1560-1750, Religious Cultures in the Early Modern World.
He explained his rationale, linking slavery and polygamy in the process: "The nation found it necessary to invoke [bayonets] against slavery when nothing else would suffice, and I am not clear that we shall not yet have to invoke them against polygamy, the other 'twin relic,' before we are well quit of that diabolism.
There was not a whiff of diabolism in the opening adagio, where the shade of Don Giovanni should stalk; the andante plodded rather than sang and the final was hardly exhilarating.
Psanek appears to Daphne momentarily as the embodiment of the devil, an echo of the earlier repartee with her about the healthy qualities of diabolism.
And unlike Europe's Jews, their religions (to the degree that they were believed to have any) could be mapped only through diabolism.
Adopting Derridean terminology, they call this the "prosthetic" model of reading practiced by Oedipa: "[R]eading, to refer back to the demon, would involve a sort of perpetual motion between sensitivity and diabolism in which animate connects with inanimate to produce, or constitute sense.
This points to the sociocultural climate of the late-Middle Ages of European society as the single most important factor feeding into the early-modern witch hunt, this despite the concept of diabolism triggered by various natural disasters, including the Black Death and the Little Ice Age, (23) and despite the legal facilitation of torture, which served only as a means to an end of persecution.
The glory as well as the fund-raising of the missions were in direct proportion to the degradation and diabolism of the heathen.
Self-accusing diabolism aside, this exclamation suggests an extraordinarily intimate relationship with God.
Fernando Cervantes, The Devil in the New World: The Impact of Diabolism in New Spain (New Haven, Conn.
Sara Melzer's examination of how the colonial 'savage' was conceptualized by the French elite is more informative about the role of magic, as represented by diabolism, in cultural negotiation and social transformation.
Nathan Johnstone argues that the development of the understanding of diabolism within the period following the Reformation focused on the idea of an internal struggle with the devil, which manifested itself in the temptations commonly experienced by Christians.
A discourse of diabolism swiftly follows to paint a threatening picture of the enemy's evil savagery and goad the nation to defend its holy democratic soul against civilization's wicked foes.