devalue

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Synonyms for devalue

Synonyms for devalue

to become or make less in price or value

Synonyms for devalue

remove the value from

lower the value or quality of

References in periodicals archive ?
My biggest fear would be devaluing what I have achieved and devaluing the jersey.
From a selfish perspective it's really annoying because it devalues our Test series and it's also devaluing this one-day series," The Sydney Morning Herald quoted Flower, as saying.
Where there is a clear case of a real exchange rate misalignment and where there are efficiency and equality reasons to change the exchange rate regime in order to regain international competitiveness, devaluing is always an option.
But printing loads of money has the effect of devaluing the money already in circulation.
However, it seems devaluing tradition in football is a regular occurrence.
His style - half-stand-up comedy and half 'beat' poet - has seen him accused of devaluing the form by sniffier contemporaries but his work connects to the mainstream in a way few others poets can.
Nietzsche serves as the key figure in stating and manifesting "postmodernity's transcending" and thus its devaluing of God and, with God, devaluing of humanity.
Economics As A Symptom Of Sadism forcefully questions why American culture celebrates achievements in sports or celebrity--which are ultimately nothing more than putting a ball through a hoop or a hole, looking and behaving good for a camera, or being able to sing--while devaluing the real building-block professions, such as educating young people.
HAVING recently had occasion to visit Liverpool, I find it incomprehensible how it could ever merit the accolade of 'European Capital of Cul Whilst there may well be plenty of cultural interest behind the hidden aspects of this derelict city, the external aspects can in no way commend itself to the outsider, or casual observer, and, results only in devaluing the concept of culture as universally understood.
When China had a slump in domestic demand ten years ago, it compensated by devaluing the currency and promoting an export boom.
In her inability to control these metaphors, Cavendish aligns herself with the masculine discourse, by devaluing women's domestic labor and reinforcing class division and identity.