desegregate

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  • verb

Synonyms for desegregate

to open to all people regardless of race

Synonyms

Synonyms for desegregate

open (a place) to members of all races and ethnic groups

Synonyms

Antonyms

References in periodicals archive ?
Reynolds told the board that she was concerned about desegregating children's services.
However, desegregating prisons is not as simple as eliminating race as a factor and placing inmates in cells based on height, weight, age or other rational objective criteria.
Whitaker notes that Ragsdale and a compatriot succeeded in desegregating many of the city's main corporations in 1962, two years before the U.
So, besides desegregating schools, what does Kozol want to do?
Parks's quiet dignity--like that of Robinson desegregating major-league baseball in 1947--made her ideal for the test case.
Known for courageous civil rights decision, he wrote orders desegregating schools, pools, golf courses, and the zoo and sided with the Rev.
Instead, he participated in a nonviolent protest at a white-only officer's club at Freeman Field in Indiana - an action that helped pave the way for Executive Order 9981, signed by President Harry Truman in 1948, desegregating the military.
Leon Sullivan, a member of the GM board of directors, complicated the call for withdrawal by providing an apparent alternative, a code of conduct for corporations calling for such things as desegregating lunchrooms and other workplace facilities and offering educational and career advancement opportunities to their own black workers.
Would the Court have ruled that the federal government had an overriding interest in desegregating schools?
The concrete throughout the building is desegregating.
This was followed by orders desegregating the local Montgomery YMCAs, which had been given free use of Montgomery's parks and playgrounds.
The examination of the civil rights movement on the grass roots level provides the best linkage to the process of desegregating the team sports industry.
Wonham's Criticism and the Color Line: Desegregating American Literary Studies effectively deflate the arguments of racial purists who would insist upon the sanctity of Anglo-American literary production.
Governors and legislators, including most notoriously George Wallace in Alabama and Ross Barnett in Mississippi, built political campaigns around their theatrical opposition to desegregating state universities.