deprecate

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  • verb

Synonyms for deprecate

disapprove of

Synonyms

Synonyms for deprecate

to have or express an unfavorable opinion of

Synonyms for deprecate

express strong disapproval of

Related Words

References in periodicals archive ?
After explaining that "jungle fever," the title of a Spike Lee movie, is used popularly and deprecatingly among blacks to mean interracial sex among whites and blacks, Little says that he wishes to use jungle fever "to point less to an interracial dynamic per se than to the cultural and multicultural anxieties giving rise to these scenes as sites and sights through which England as a nation and empire chooses to name and visualize itself" (15).
the extent that we would read a study like this, and deprecatingly ask
In the course of a song, Naomi and Jack's sweet rendition of "My Lord What a Morning," Simmi, the tough follower of Michael X, puts the moves on Abigail, who deprecatingly resists.
They were able to find a small metal pole building that Linda deprecatingly refers to as a "farmer's shed," and they were in business.
Edward Long, writing in 1776, deprecatingly dismissed the travails of widowhood by quoting with approval the acerbic comments of a seventeenth-century governor, Sir Nicholas Lawes, that "the female art of growing rich" was to "marry and bury"--but for many women, faced with raising children by themselves in a society which was unusually discriminatory towards women, the need to remarry was undoubtedly of paramount importance.
Interestingly, it is used by writers on both sides of the religious-political spectrum - pridefully or deprecatingly.
His wit, though spoken lightly, deprecatingly, is pointed.
1 on the call sheet, before the actors,'' Miller says self- deprecatingly.
He describes his new book, deprecatingly, as "a self-indulgence.
Rather as Mrs Thatcher said "the Lady's not for turning", so Cumani himself might deprecatingly remark "the wop's not for the chop" and he has an uncanny knack of chiselling out what he calls a `headline horse' with whom to take on the big battalions.