deoxygenate

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Words related to deoxygenate

remove oxygen from (water)

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References in periodicals archive ?
Warming and deoxygenation are also caused by rising carbon dioxide emissions, underlining the importance of reducing fossil fuel emissions.
2] sc would be associated with a contribution from the arms which would be manifest as a progressive deoxygenation (expressed as an increasing [DLETA][Hb]) in the interrogated arm musculature as the exercise proceeded.
The beverage industry looks to membrane contactors for carbonation, nitrogenation and deoxygenation.
Deoxygenation of the deep waters of Lake Victoria, East Africa.
The company uses the Red Wolf Process, which uses hydrolysis, deoxygenation and hydrocarbon reforming to convert oils into "green" gasoline, jet fuel and diesel.
2]Hb concentration from the maximum level of deoxygenation at the end of exercise to the maximum level of reoxygenation during the post-activity rest period.
Prior studies have revealed mild decreases in tissue oxygenation during exercise in healthy adults and severe deoxygenation in individuals with intermittent claudication (4-8).
This abnormal deoxygenation (Table II) causes an abnormal split of the ferric superoxide complex ([Fe.
Although fish have adapted to survive such conditions for short periods, prolonged ice cover can cause eventual deoxygenation and the subsequent death of fish beneath the ice.
Although fish are adapted to survive such conditions for short periods, prolonged ice cover can cause eventual deoxygenation and the subsequent death of fish beneath the ice.
This change results in Hb tetramers that aggregate into arrays upon deoxygenation in the tissues, leading to deformation of red blood cells (RBCs) into sickle-like shapes, making them relatively inflexible and unable to traverse the capillary beds.
We've found and optimized a selective, one-pot deoxygenation technique based on a formic acid treatment," said Robert Bergman, a co-principal investigator on this project who holds a joint appointment with Berkeley Lab's Chemical Sciences Division and the UC Berkeley Chemistry Department.
The causes of the reduced respiratory muscle strength aren't known but these authors suggested a role for a depressed oxidative capacity of the working muscles linked to under-perfusion and deoxygenation of respiratory muscles during exercise; even hyperventilation itself enhanced the demands on inspiratory muscles.