den

(redirected from dens)
Also found in: Dictionary, Medical, Legal, Acronyms, Idioms, Encyclopedia.
Graphic Thesaurus  🔍
Display ON
Animation ON
Legend
Synonym
Antonym
Related
  • noun

Synonyms for den

Synonyms for den

a place used as an animal's dwelling

a hiding place

Synonyms for den

the habitation of wild animals

Synonyms

Related Words

a hiding place

Related Words

a unit of 8 to 10 cub scouts

Related Words

a room that is comfortable and secluded

References in classic literature ?
Und den Bertran kill him with his hands, und I go for a walk upon der heach.
Dey'll sell dese niggers today fo' stealin' de money, den dey'll buy some mo' dat don't now de chillen--so dat's all right.
And she went into the den next door, where another mother-lion lived, and told her all about it.
His door was barricaded by a set of ingenious bolts of his own invention, for the sieges were frequent by the neighbours when any unusually ambrosial odour spread itself from the den to the neighbouring studies.
Tom gave a kick, the other bolt creaked, and he entered the den.
Just now he had hit upon a grand invention, and the den was lighted by a flaring cotton wick issuing from a ginger-beer bottle full of some doleful composition.
I give you good den, sweet friends," quoth Little John, striding up to where they sat.
Give thee good den, holy father," quoth the merry Beggar with a grin.
Truly, your words have smitten my sinful heart, so that I will abide no longer in this den of evil, but will go forward with you.
And if there were a contest, and he had to compete in measuring the shadows with the prisoners who had never moved out of the den, while his sight was still weak, and before his eyes had become steady (and the time which would be needed to acquire this new habit of sight might be very considerable) would he not be ridiculous?
And he will count the one happy in his condition and state of being, and he will pity the other; or, if he have a mind to laugh at the soul which comes from below into the light, there will be more reason in this than in the laugh which greets him who returns from above out of the light into the den.
Between a slop-shop and a gin-shop, approached by a steep flight of steps leading down to a black gap like the mouth of a cave, I found the den of which I was in search.
In a very short time a decrepit figure had emerged from the opium den, and I was walking down the street with Sherlock Holmes.
Tradition says she spent the last two years of her life in the strange den I have been speaking of, after having indulged herself in one final, triumphant, and satisfying spree.
Two or three hundred years ago, this would have made the poor den holy ground; and the church would have set up a miracle-factory there and made plenty of money out of it.