dementia

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Related to dementias: prescient, nascent, senile dementia
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Synonyms for dementia

serious mental illness or disorder impairing a person's capacity to function normally and safely

Synonyms for dementia

References in periodicals archive ?
Today, approaches to dementia care continue to vary greatly throughout the industry with regard to:
But the very nature of our residents' dementias makes flexibility just as important as structure.
Structuring the sequence of daily events on both day and evening shifts affords the continuity and specific direction dementia patients require.
Alzheimers Society and Alzheimers Research UK have today both pledged 50 million each towards the work of the Institute, led by the Medical Research Council (MRC), in one of the single biggest financial commitments to dementia research in the history of both charities.
The Government must commit to tripling its annual support for dementia research to pounds 96m within five years.
BOSTON -- Atrial fibrillation may be a significant cause of dementia, based on links between the two disorders in a study of 37,000 people.
Dementia rates rose sharply as people got older, the researchers report in the October PLoSMedicine.
Dementia developed in a patient with widespread neurologic manifestations; she died within 5 months.
BALTIMORE -- Treating the risk factors that cause vascular disease could slow the progression of preexisting dementia and possibly prevent its onset.
So, those of us who care for people with Alzheimer's and other dementias must ask ourselves, "Is my body language welcoming, inviting, and friendly?
Of non-Alzheimer's dementias, abnormal gait predicted the development of vascular dementia (hazard ratio, 3.
In the second study, Herschel Jick and co-workers at the Boston University School of Medicine and elsewhere identified 284 people aged 50 or older who were diagnosed as having Alzheimer's or another form of dementia in a data base of more than 60,000 patients in the United Kingdom.
The reference is a broad-ranging review of Alzheimer's disease and other dementias from both basic and clinical neuroscience perspectives; it provides scientists and medical professionals with an extensive introduction and an up-to-date review of cutting-edge scientific advances.
4% in 1999), while "other" dementias dropped only slightly, from 68.
Moreover, EEG can, to a certain extent, differentiate among the degenerative dementias.