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In this example qi does not function exactly as a second-person possessive pronoun, but more accurately as a deictic word referring to something already mentioned or implied.
But since yu is also a deictic word, we don't know who "I" here is unless we go back further to the beginning of this sentence.
We should, however note that he is an interrogative pronoun, not strictly a deictic word.
Furthermore, on the basis of a contextual analysis of jue, qi, and nai in the examples given so far, we have detected the existence of a markedness that serves to distinguish these deictic words.
Furthermore, deictic words such as zhi si [CHINESE CHARACTERS NOT REPRODUCIBLE IN ASCII TEXT], si [CHINESE CHARACTERS NOT REPRODUCIBLE IN ASCII TEXT], si [CHINESE CHARACTERS NOT REPRODUCIBLE IN ASCII TEXT], zhu [CHINESE CHARACTERS NOT REPRODUCIBLE IN ASCII TEXT] (which contains the zhi [CHINESE CHARACTERS NOT REPRODUCIBLE IN ASCII TEXT] element), and qi [CHINESE CHARACTERS NOT REPRODUCIBLE IN ASCII TEXT] in the examples cited above, are observed invariably in a weak-syllable position regardless of the iambic or trochaic pattern.
The use of such obvious deictic words as er [CHINESE CHARACTERS NOT REPRODUCIBLE IN ASCII TEXT] qi [CHINESE CHARACTERS NOT REPRODUCIBLE IN ASCII TEXT], zi [CHINESE CHARACTERS NOT REPRODUCIBLE IN ASCII TEXT], zhi [CHINESE CHARACTERS NOT REPRODUCIBLE IN ASCII TEXT], nai [CHINESE CHARACTERS NOT REPRODUCIBLE IN ASCII TEXT], yan [CHINESE CHARACTERS NOT REPRODUCIBLE IN ASCII TEXT], and zhu [CHINESE CHARACTERS NOT REPRODUCIBLE IN ASCII TEXT], in the unstressed or weak-syllable position is of particular interest here.
Earlier we followed Todo's idea of assigning a weak-syllable feature to deictic words such as er [CHINESE CHARACTERS NOT REPRODUCIBLE IN ASCII TEXT], qi [CHINESE CHARACTERS NOT REPRODUCIBLE IN ASCII TEXT], zi [CHINESE CHARACTERS NOT REPRODUCIBLE IN ASCII TEXT], zhi [CHINESE CHARACTERS NOT REPRODUCIBLE IN ASCII TEXT], nai [CHINESE CHARACTERS NOT REPRODUCIBLE IN ASCII TEXT], etc.
In a manner that accords with our analysis so far, I suggest that the presence in rhyme position of the deictic words [CHINESE CHARACTERS NOT REPRODUCIBLE IN ASCII TEXT] and [CHINESE CHARACTERS NOT REPRODUCIBLE IN ASCII TEXT] and particle [CHINESE CHARACTERS NOT REPRODUCIBLE IN ASCII TEXT] further manifests rhyme-meter conflict.
We encounter a difficulty, however, if we wish to maintain that all deictic words receive the weak-syllable feature in Classical Chinese prosodic structure.
As a matter of principle, I would like to maintain Todo's original proposal (1953) that all deictic words receive the weak-syllable feature.