medicine

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Synonyms for medicine

Synonyms for medicine

an agent used to restore health

a substance used in the treatment of disease

Synonyms for medicine

the branches of medical science that deal with nonsurgical techniques

Related Words

(medicine) something that treats or prevents or alleviates the symptoms of disease

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punishment for one's actions

treat medicinally, treat with medicine

References in periodicals archive ?
Sethi previously was involved in a similar study of orthopaedic surgeons in Massachusetts that found comparable results, but this is the first to demonstrate defensive medicine practices are common throughout the country.
Defensive medicine may both increase health care costs and reduce access.
Like Dubay and colleagues, they concluded that defensive medicine, in this context, was modest.
We can compare those findings to Kessler and McClellan's estimates of the magnitude of defensive medicine.
Howard's third sub-claim is that liability encourages defensive medicine (i.
Physicians reportedly practice defensive medicine in certain clinical situations, thereby contributing to health care costs; however, the overall prevalence and costs of such practices have not been reliably measured.
He points out that a number of empirical studies have found that defensive medicine accounts for a relatively small percentage of total health care costs, and most publicity about defensive medicine comes from those who oppose the malpractice system.
If you're worried about getting sued all the time, then there is the natural tendency to practice what they call defensive medicine," the President told the doctors in Scranton.
In this latest poll, 81% said they tended to practise defensive medicine, which was a rise compared to the 71% who did two years ago.
As mentioned above, discussions about deterrence necessitate taking note of the phenomenon of defensive medicine.
Physicians do faithfully report to the American Medical Association that they practice defensive medicine.
Furthermore, true health care reform cannot be accomplished without a radical change in the medical malpractice system that would eliminate frivolous lawsuits and the very expensive practice of defensive medicine.
These legal costs and the defensive medicine practices they induce greatly inflate the cost of health care.
One recent study, however, breaks new ground in attempting to reconcile various estimates of the cost of defensive medicine.
Others employ the treadmill as defensive medicine, fearful of malpractice suits.