decide

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Related to decidable: Decidable problem
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Synonyms for decide

make a decision

Synonyms

Synonyms for decide

to make a decision about (a controversy or dispute, for example) after deliberation, as in a court of law

to make up or cause to make up one's mind

Synonyms for decide

References in periodicals archive ?
A data model is a language with a decidable homomorphism to an algebra including at least one relation.
Using any deterministic sequential computing machine, NP problems are verifiable in polynomial time while they are not decidable except in exponential time" [11, page 265].
The play is shot through with examples of how perspective skews perception, except that in Stoppard's case the situation is, finally, decidable as the two who are in disagreement about the identity of the object find out that the object was, most certainly, an umbrella.
There is something that refuses containment, that won't be exhausted, doesn't have decidable social uses, in writing that continues to be valued as literary.
And any attempt to juggle simultaneously both literal and ironic meanings cannot help but disrupt our notions of meaning as something single, decidable, or stable.
Where it is decidable is with regard to the locations he did not mention: for example, the neck.
Let us prove that, if the problem above was decidable, then we could decide the emptiness of binary [Z.
In these injunctions, Hurst still wishes to deny decidable outcome, but affirm at least the possibility of decidable outcome, and preserve a plural logic, and the oppositional outside to do so.
Firstly, the Sanctuary's organization defies linguistic correspondence because it has no decidable content: members are free to leave, and the outsiders can enter as well.
DL are decidable fragments of first-order logic, which are used to represent the domain concept definitions in a structured and formally well-understood way.
We have to use a formalism able to describe the ontology vocabulary, to support query formulation and to provide decidable reasoning mechanisms.
The author also rebuts Williamson's criticism of the author's argument for the claim that any proposition of the form "it is known that" is decidable if is decidable.
You can't do this work of juxtaposition in a Hollywood plot, which excludes everything that is really significant and not readily decidable.