debunk

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Synonyms for debunk

Synonyms for debunk

to cause to be no longer believed or valued

Synonyms for debunk

References in periodicals archive ?
Chapter 10 debunks the kind of elaborate conspiracy theories that The X-Files exploited so well.
The memo debunks the frequent claims from Falwell and others that the First Amendment bars the IRS from revoking a church's tax-exempt status for partisan politicking.
Masalha debunks those myths by showing how the land was cleared of the indigenous population.
But a recent survey by Princeton University researchers debunks the charge.
Howard debunks the myth that everything of importance in LGBT life has al ways been and always will be confined to coastal cities.
Why would any of them vote for the Alliance when its leader debunks them as "right- wing" "scary" extremists.
In The Tomato in America, Andrew Smith debunks quite a bit of the mythology surrounding the love apple, its rise to glory in the American palate, its fall out of favor, and its second coming.
It debunks the conspiracy on its Web site, at http ://kids.
What remains is a factual commentary that debunks many of the traditionally accepted notions long held by anglophiles on both sides of the Atlantic.
Lomborg also debunks the widely circulated claim that the world will soon lose up to half of its species.
The study, by the Rand Institute of Civil Justice debunks a myth often supported by opponents of a no-fault system, said Robert Hartwig, chief economist at the Insurance Information Institute.
Along the way, he debunks the arguments of anti-egalitarians, weighs in on affirmative action, talks about the need to equalize access to political power ("limiting the power of those corporate entities that dispose of immense wealth is the highest priority of democratic equality"), discusses what equality might require internationally, and calls for a mass movement founded on "egalitarian solidarity.
Although Martin debunks the notion that pre-industrial leisure reflected the harmonious community of contemporary observers' memories, Killing Time shows that industrialization spawned more commercial forms of leisure such as operas and circuses, which also transformed pre-existing holidays, such as the Fourth of July.
Of particular importance are the heart disease myths that Heart Attack thoroughly debunks, such as "if I have no symptoms, I'm not at risk", "heart disease begins in adulthood", and "smoking only hurts the lungs/cigars are 'safe'".